Archives for November 2012

From The ‘Why The?’ And ‘What The?’ File: Artist Cai Guo-Qiang Will Blow Up A Pine Tree On The National Mall.

Cai Guo-Qiang blows up a 40 ft pine tree in the National Mall.That’s right, art is kicking Jubbling in the middle again because nothing says art like blowing up a 40′ pine tree with fireworks. This time it’s the work of artist Cai Guo-Qiang and is part of an art series celebrating 50 Years of Art in Embassies. Here’s the plan (from the Washington City Paper):

“Using 2,000 firework-like explosives, Guo-Qiang will take the pine tree through three pyrotechnic stages: The tree will first be covered in yellow and white sparkles of light. The lights will spread throughout the tree, simulating twinkling Christmas lights. Then the tree will explode in a cloud of black smoke, leaving a “negative” smoke image that resembles a Chinese ink painting drifting off into the wind. The idea is for the tree-shaped smoke to create the image of two trees—as seen in Guo-Qiang’s sketch.”

The big wasteful display is taking place tonight and fortunately I won’t be within 4500 clicks of the event. Watch out moon – your next. [City Paper via Grist]



Update: Dec 1, 2012 The 40′ pine tree execution went off as planned.

Now this tree is growing? Hopefully, the perplexed audience walked away from this performance art thinking instead that “once this tree was growing.”

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Some Eco-Friendly Alternatives To Your Traditional Christmas Tree Are Not Very Cash-Friendly To Your Wallet.

One Two Tree.Cut Christmas trees and Halloween pumpkins share a common afterlife – they both have a meaningful place in our home for a short period of time and then they’re both hastily discarded. That’s why finding a lasting alternative to the traditional Christmas tree is so important.

Jubiltree Non-Traditional Christmas Tree Alternative.Inhabitat’s article, “14 Eco-Friendly Design Alternatives to the Traditional Christmas Tree,” was well-researched, timely and offered eco’ish alternatives to traditional Christmas trees but the prices can get more pretty crazy. Granted, a few of the smaller non-traditional tree options sell in the $20 range but four of the models listed in the artcle are priced above $349 and the wooden Jubiltree* eclipses the $500 mark. I may be wrong but I don’t think unreasonably over-priced alt-Christmas trees are going to change buying habits.

That’s why Jubbling would like to help you find reusable Christmas tree options that won’t crush your bank account and can be sourced locally. Our two reusable picks are the potted living Christmas tree and a used plastic tree from your local Goodwill store.

Going with a reusable potted living Christmas tree ($50-75) requires some management but it’s a great option for people who prefer an un-dead natural tree. If you’re ok with a plastic one, Goodwill has an assortment of previously-loved options in the $5-20 price range. Ideally, purchasing a used plastic tree means another new one will not be manufactured.

Consumers shouldn’t have to spend $500 on a eco-suavé Christmas tree alternative in order to gain some green street cred. Reusable Christmas trees that are wallet-friendly and match your preference (natural or artificial) are available and you don’t have to travel very far to find one. [Inhabitat]


*Jubiltree and Jubbling are not related.

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Larry Hagman Was Much More Than J. R. Ewing.

Larry Hagman's Solar Array

” Now, not everyone can put in the gonzo [solar] array I did; however, we can all learn from the mistakes of the past and make positive differences right now and for the future.” – Larry Hagman, 2011

If you get a chance, please visit Larry Hagman’s website and read his open letter about making life changes, solar energy and the future. Mr. Hagman (1931-2012) wrote the inspirational letter in 2011 and reading it is well worth your time. [MNN]

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Jubbling’s Mustn’t Have Product Of The Week: Fujitsu’s Wandant Dog Pedometer.

Wandant Dog Pedometer from FujitsuFujitsu Wandant Dog PedometerWho’d buy this? It’s the Wandant Dog Pedometer from Fujitsu and it monitors and records your dog’s daily actions (walking, shivering etc.) so you can track how lazy or busy your fattening pooch has been. The data from the Wandant Dog Pedometer is automatically uploaded to the cloud and graphically displayed. Pet owners can add and track additional information including food volume, stool conditions and current weight using a diary feature on the website. Currently, the Wandant Dog Pedometer is only available in Japan.

At Jubbling, we never pass up an opportunity to help consumers consume less and here’s how you avoid the cloud-wasting unnecessary Wandant Dog Pedometer:

If your dog used to look like this…

Skinny Boxer Dog


…and now looks like this…

Fat Boxer Dog


…then you should probably cut back on how much you feed your dog and take him out for more walks. No need to waste cloud space, time (documenting poop) and money on a product that will graphically inform you that your embiggening dog isn’t active. Let your eyes tell you that your dog could drop a few pounds. [Crave]

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

A Jubbling Exclusive: We Discovered What Happens To The Ostrich Pillow When It Grows Up.

Ostrich PillowThe micro-environment creating Ostrich Pillow is an in-office, in-airport, in-park and in-stuck in traffic nap generating chunk of awesomeness. It even made it on Treehugger (Eco-Friendly Mag) and Ecouterre. Jubbling had to find out more about the Ostrich Pillow and that’s when we stumbled upon the cold weather bodysuit (Ostrich Pillow 2.0?) from Femke Agema.

Femke Agema designed cold weather body suit.
Watch your ass Snuggie! [Femke Agema via Neatorama]

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail

Trike-Bike Transportable Bao House: When Tiny Homes Go Bad.

Bao House from dot ArchitectsCould the Bao House from dot Architects be the mobile padded cell for the on-the-go mental health counselor? No, it’s a spray polyurethane foam (SPF) stuffed structure that’s toted around by a tricycle bike and touted as a possible “tiny home.” Bao is the Chinese word for bulge and I can’t help thinking about the disappointed web traffic they would’ve received had dot Architects gone with Bulge House instead.

Move along folks – not much to see here. [Treehugger]

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail