The Goal Of ‘One Third’ Rotting Food Photos By Klaus Pichler Is To Get Us To Waste Less Food

Klaus Pichler - One Third Exhibition

“I don’t get it… I don’t get it.”

Paul (John Heard), Movie “Big”


I really don’t get it. Klaus Pichler’s photo exhibition, One Third, about the amount of food wasted each year just seems like a waste in itself. Call me crazy but seeing pictures of rotting food doesn’t motivate me to hold onto dated items longer – it makes me want to check the dates on what I have in the fridge and start chucking stuff out.


Klaus Pichler - One Third Exhibition  Rotting Cookies
Inhabitat has a back story on the One Third exhibition and that it took its name from a UN study on how 1/3 of all food is wasted. Mr. Pichler also includes information on how the rotting food in the photographs was harvested and their respective carbon footprints.

Still can’t help feeling more than a little confused whenever I read about or see something considered art that partakes in what it purports to be against. Pictures: amazing. Message: lost. [Inhabitat ]

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Comments

  1. It’s all about provocation, that’s the very essence of the series. It shall provoke to rethink your consuming habits, rethink the way you shop food, the way you use food, the way you value food. Assuming that food waste just has to do something with best-before-dates is not correct – they are just one aspect of a whole. Food waste in the global north (the rich part of the world) is mainly caused by supermarket policies and consumer decisions. And the disability to value food as it should be valued: as an essential, a luxury, a gift. And not as a product.
    Further discussion desired? Feel free! 😉

  2. Klaus –
    Thank you for commenting and thanks for visiting our site.

    I do agree with your comment that food should be valued as a gift. The pervasive belief that “if you can afford it, you can dispose it” is the wrong way to think about food but it’s unfortunately the norm in the “rich part of the world.”

    The idea of provoking people to act makes sense. Provoking is why your photos are all over the internet right now – it’s how I found your work. Personally, your photos did provoke me but they didn’t get me to think about food waste and that’s why I wrote the post.

    Thanks again for commenting. We don’t get a lot of legitimate comments on our site so it was nice to receive yours.

    Paul