Sorry Kids. All I Want For Christmas Is For You To NOT Build A Wasteful Gingerbread House This Year.

Gingerbread Millennium Falcon

Gingerbread Millennium Falcon

In the US, it sure seems like our end-of-year holidays are highlighted by waste. Halloween Jack O’ lanterns, Thanksgiving turkey (35% wasted) and once-living Christmas trees are all valued guests prior and during their respective holiday but become unwelcome squatters immediately following. That’s because they’re a symptom of our post-holiday hangover and helping them find the trash is the only cure.

Gingerbread House KitThat’s why Jubbling would like to add one more holiday item to the not list: the Gingerbread House. Here’s why:

  1. How many Gingerbread Houses have you built during Christmas?
  2. Of those, how many have you eaten completely?

If your first answer matched your second, we’re non-judgementally impressed. For most people though, the Gingerbread House might get picked clean of its Skittles, Red Vines, frosting and some roof but the remaining Gingerbread Slum will probably meet the garbage can soon after Christmas. We’ve been there and that’s why we’re NOT buying a Gingerbread House kit this year.

Destroyed Gingerbread HouseOf course we could still build and decorate an edible tiny home using graham crackers and homemade icing. Going small, without losing the festive-fun, is not a bad option.

But the Gingerbread House kit is out. I think we’ve disposed a lifetime’s worth of gingerbread in the last 10 years and it’s a good time to give up one wasteful habit.


Related articles: Woman Bakes Entire Block of Brooklyn Brownstone Homes Out of Gingerbread

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Some Eco-Friendly Alternatives To Your Traditional Christmas Tree Are Not Very Cash-Friendly To Your Wallet.

One Two Tree.Cut Christmas trees and Halloween pumpkins share a common afterlife – they both have a meaningful place in our home for a short period of time and then they’re both hastily discarded. That’s why finding a lasting alternative to the traditional Christmas tree is so important.

Jubiltree Non-Traditional Christmas Tree Alternative.Inhabitat’s article, “14 Eco-Friendly Design Alternatives to the Traditional Christmas Tree,” was well-researched, timely and offered eco’ish alternatives to traditional Christmas trees but the prices can get more pretty crazy. Granted, a few of the smaller non-traditional tree options sell in the $20 range but four of the models listed in the artcle are priced above $349 and the wooden Jubiltree* eclipses the $500 mark. I may be wrong but I don’t think unreasonably over-priced alt-Christmas trees are going to change buying habits.

That’s why Jubbling would like to help you find reusable Christmas tree options that won’t crush your bank account and can be sourced locally. Our two reusable picks are the potted living Christmas tree and a used plastic tree from your local Goodwill store.

Going with a reusable potted living Christmas tree ($50-75) requires some management but it’s a great option for people who prefer an un-dead natural tree. If you’re ok with a plastic one, Goodwill has an assortment of previously-loved options in the $5-20 price range. Ideally, purchasing a used plastic tree means another new one will not be manufactured.

Consumers shouldn’t have to spend $500 on a eco-suavé Christmas tree alternative in order to gain some green street cred. Reusable Christmas trees that are wallet-friendly and match your preference (natural or artificial) are available and you don’t have to travel very far to find one. [Inhabitat]


*Jubiltree and Jubbling are not related.

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Lulu Wraps Reusable Gift Wrap May Be Appreciated More Than The Crappy Gift You’re Wrapping

The amount of gift wrap we go through every year is nuts. According to eHow.com, 1/2 of the paper we consume each year is for gift wrap and decorations for consumer products and 2 billion trees need to be cut down in order to support our bad habit. The numbers seem high but the fact is, gift wrap is extremely temporary and wasteful. Lulu Wraps That’s why it’s nice to hear about companies like Lulu Wraps. Lulu Wraps out of Portland Oregon makes reusable fabric wraps and their wrapping solutions are inspired by traditional cloth wraps from Japan (furoshiki), Korea (bogaji) and Indonesia (buntelan or pundutan). Lulu Wraps are made from several different types of fabric including organic cotton, hemp/silk, vintage sari fabric and designer remnants. A nice side benefit of Lulu Wraps is that in addition to working as gift wrap, they can also be folded and used year-round as lunch or tote bags.

Check out Lulu Wraps website for ideas and to order product.

[vimeo width=”383″ height=”215″]http://vimeo.com/2321507[/vimeo]

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Potted “Living” Christmas Trees Redux

We decided to bring back the Potted Living Christmas Tree (PLCT) post from last year because it’s informative and out of a desperate need for content. This will be year six for our PLCT and unfortunately for my wife, it looks just as Charlie Brown’ish as it did last year.

Charlie Brown Christmas TreeWhen it comes to buying a Christmas tree, the decision for most is to choose between artificial or a barely dead tree. If you go artificial, you can get perfection every year and spend the holidays convincing everyone how close your artificial tree looks to an actual one. If you go to the Christmas tree lot and get a recently-departed tree, you can choose from a hundred or so trees and find the right height and fullness. You can even get it flocked on the spot if that’s your preference. Now Jubbling wants to recommend an alternative – the potted “living” Christmas tree.

A potted Christmas tree is exactly what the name suggests – take a trip to your local nursery and pick out a potted tree to use as your Christmas tree. Jubbling Christmas Tree According to our local nursery, Bainbridge Gardens, robust and durable types of living Christmas trees include the Norway Spruce, Korean Fir, Balsam Fir, Frasier Fir and the Colorado Blue Spruce. They may not be as attractive as an artificial or once-living tree but since it is a potted Christmas tree, you can roll it outside to your porch or patio after the holiday and water it until you use it again the next year. It’s Jubbling 101. Ten years ago, I decided to give it a shot and I purchased a potted tree that ended up in my yard after Christmas. Then in 2004, I decided to do it again only this time I put the tree in a pot and put it outside after Christmas. We have nothing on the Charlie Brown Christmas tree but a little Jubbling and my original $65 investment has carried forward for the last 4 Christmases.

Caring for a Potted Christmas Tree – Limiting the amount of time your potted Christmas tree spends in your house is the best way to make sure it survives the holiday. According to Jenni at Bainbridge Gardens, the best way to care for a potted Christmas tree is:

Before the living Christmas tree goes into the house, give it some transitional time in an unheated garage or outbuilding. If it will be indoors for 5-6 days, it should be in a transitional area for a similar length of time. Check the plant daily and water as needed to keep the soil moist but not soggy. We recommend placing the tree in a room that’s between 60 and 65 degrees if possible and definitely not near a heat register.

Our potted Christmas tree will spend 2 weeks in the house but you’re better off following Jenni’s guidelines. Contact your local nursery and see what they have available. A potted Christmas tree may not look perfect but it will more than serve its purpose and that is to hold ornaments, lights and allow you to put presents underneath it.

My kids still pull the “dad’s cheap” card on me but in the end, I think they know it’s Jubbling. And given the option of switching our holiday from celebrating Christmas to Festivus, my kids appreciate the potted Christmas tree a little more. The last thing they want to experience is Festivus and the traditional raising of the aluminum pole.

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Potted “Living” Christmas Trees

Charlie Brown Christmas TreeWhen it comes to buying a Christmas tree, the decision for most is to choose between artificial or a barely dead tree. If you go artificial, you can get perfection every year and spend the holidays convincing everyone how close your artificial tree looks to an actual one. If you go to the Christmas tree lot and get a recently-departed tree, you can choose from a hundred or so trees and find the right height and fullness. You can even get it flocked on the spot if that’s your preference. Now Jubbling wants to recommend an alternative – the potted “living” Christmas tree.

A potted Christmas tree is exactly what the name suggests – take a trip to your local nursery and pick out a potted tree to use as your Christmas tree. Jubbling Christmas Tree According to our local nursery, Bainbridge Gardens, robust and durable types of living Christmas trees include the Norway Spruce, Korean Fir, Balsam Fir, Frasier Fir and the Colorado Blue Spruce. They may not be as attractive as an artificial or once-living tree but since it is a potted Christmas tree, you can roll it outside to your porch or patio after the holiday and water it until you use it again the next year. It’s Jubbling 101. Ten years ago, I decided to give it a shot and I purchased a potted tree that ended up in my yard after Christmas. Then in 2004, I decided to do it again only this time I put the tree in a pot and put it outside after Christmas. We have nothing on the Charlie Brown Christmas tree but a little Jubbling and my original $65 investment has carried forward for the last 4 Christmases.

Caring for a Potted Christmas Tree – Limiting the amount of time your potted Christmas tree spends in your house is the best way to make sure it survives the holiday. According to Jenni at Bainbridge Gardens, the best way to care for a potted Christmas tree is:

Before the living Christmas tree goes into the house, give it some transitional time in an unheated garage or outbuilding. If it will be indoors for 5-6 days, it should be in a transitional area for a similar length of time. Check the plant daily and water as needed to keep the soil moist but not soggy. We recommend placing the tree in a room that’s between 60 and 65 degrees if possible and definitely not near a heat register.

Our potted Christmas tree will spend 2 weeks in the house but you’re better off following Jenni’s guidelines. Contact your local nursery and see what they have available. A potted Christmas tree may not look perfect but it will more than serve its purpose and that is to hold ornaments, lights and allow you to put presents underneath it.

My kids still pull the “dad’s cheap” card on me but in the end, I think they know it’s Jubbling. And given the option of switching our holiday from celebrating Christmas to Festivus, my kids appreciate the potted Christmas tree a little more. The last thing they want to experience is Festivus and the traditional raising of the aluminum pole.

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