Clotheslines Season Is Around The Corner. Check Out The Clotheslines Of 1930’s New York.

Clotheslines on laundry day in 1930's New YorkBuzzfeed posted “Monday, Laundry Day, New York City” and it was a nice reminder that clothesline season is almost here. My indoor clothesline has been working overtime this winter. I wash and hang a load on plastic coat hangers in the morning and then repeat the wash and hang process one more time in the evening.

Clotheslines on laundry day in 1930's New York

If you’re chomping at the bit and can’t wait for clothesline season, hang-dry your clothes indoors by purchasing an adjustable closet rod and a pair of wall brackets to hang your laundry over your washer/dryer. Your bathroom shower rod will work too.

Clotheslines on laundry day in 1930's New York

If you’re an anxious planner and can’t wait to get your outdoor clothesline set up, you can invest in an outdoor umbrella clothesline or get real old school and tie a rope/phone cord between to posts/trees.

Clotheslines on laundry day in 1930's New York

From my experience, wooden clothespins work the best on outdoor clothesline. Plastic clothespins become brittle from the temperature change of daytime heat and cool evenings.

Clotheslines on laundry day in 1930's New York

Good luck with clothesline season. Remember: clotheslines are the easy-to-install, affordable solar panel system. [Buzzfeed]

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Find Ways To Avoid Using Your Clothes Dryer.

Energy Stars vs WannabeGreentech posted the article “Clothes Dryers May Use 35% More Energy Than Advertised” that highlighted the fact that clothes dryers have not received an Energy Star rating yet and may consume even more power than posted on the appliance. Current dryer tests use dampened napkin-size polyester-cotton blended cloths, not heavy cottons, to measure how efficiently a tested clothes dryer removes moisture. In addition, the tests do not capture data as to when each individual dryer automatically shuts-off based on detected fabric moisture levels which is another measure of how one clothes dryer would consume more/less power than another model.

Testing aside, clothes dryer’s account for 4% of the total residential energy use in the United States and Jubbling thinks the best way to reduce that percentage is to avoid their use. Here are some tips on how to avoid using the clothes dryer during the fall/winter seasons:

  1. Santa shorts hanging on a clothesline.Do Your Laundry Based On The Weather Forecast: Just because it’s getting colder doesn’t mean you can’t use your outdoor clothesline. Wait for an above freezing sunny day to do your laundry and let the dry cool air do the work of your dryer.

  2. Hang Clothes Inside: Most home thermostats are set between 65 – 72 degrees which is warm enough to dry your clothes indoors. Hang them over your washer/dryer, bathroom or anywhere you have a rod installed. Looks redneck but so what. Note: avoid hanging your clothes near your kitchen or they’ll end up smelling like last night’s dinner.

  3. Mr. Mom Flannel ShirtWear Your Clothes Multiple Times Between Washings: It’s colder out and you don’t sweat as much. Take this as a challenge and see how many days you can wear the same outfit – especially if you’re married and you no longer impress your spouse.

  4. Wear Less Heavy Cottons Clothing Or Just Wear Them As Outerwear: Heavy cottons are a pain in the ass to dry. But if you like to wear heavy cottons, don’t let them touch your skin and wear them repeatedly between washing/drying (refer back to reason #3 about not impressing your spouse for extra motivation).

Clip-n-Drip clothes dryerI’d recommend using the clothes dryer for socks and underwear to lessen the amount of time you have to spend and to keep space open for larger items. Or you could go with a clip-n-drip solution that’ll hold multiple small items for air drying. [Greentech]

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Our Grandparents Were Green When It Was Just A Color

SmartPlanetSmartPlanet.com Americanized and posted a great story that started out as a “pass it forward” email. The article, “Grumpy Old Woman’s energy tips”, takes the elitism and marketing out of all things green and does so from the perspective of our grandparent’s generation. Thank you MH for allowing us to re-post the article.


Grumpy Old Woman

The Green Thing: Pay attention to the wagging finger. And for goodness sake, use the clothesline. The sun is your friend. And another thing…

By Anonymous.

Checking out at Wal-Mart, the young cashier suggested to the older woman that she should bring her own grocery bags because plastic bags weren’t good for the environment.

The woman apologized and explained, “We didn’t have this green thing back in my earlier days.”

The assistant responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations.”

She was right — our generation didn’t have the green thing in its day.

  • Back then, we returned milk bottles, soft drink bottles and beer bottles to the shop. The shop sent them back to the plant to be washed, sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled. But we didn’t have the green thing back in our day.
  • We walked up stairs because we didn’t have an elevator or escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocers and didn’t climb into a 200-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks. But she was right. We didn’t have the green thing in our day.
  • Back then, we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throw-away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy gobbling machine burning up 2000 watts — wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back then. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing. But that young lady is right. We didn’t have the green thing back in our day.
  • Back then, we had one TV or radio in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief not a screen the size of Texas. In the kitchen, we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. We didn’t have the green thing back then.
  • Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity. But she’s right. We didn’t have the green thing back then.
  • Back then, when we were thirsty, we drank from a tap instead of drinking from a plastic bottle of water shipped from the other side of the world. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the blades in a razor instead of throwing away the whole razor when the blade got dull. But we didn’t have the green thing back then.
  • Back then, people took the bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service. We had one electrical socket in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 2,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest fish and chip shop.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the green thing back then?

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Clothesline Season Is Around The Corner

Clothesline 2010 Winter Training Begins
It’s not too early to get outside in 30 degree weather and practice your clothespin pinch technique to prepare for clothesline season. We call it training at altitude. By getting your pre-season workout in and then hanging your clothes on a clotheslines, you could reduce your power bill by up to 10%. It’s time to look at clotheslines as an affordable solar panel support system. [Read more…]

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Clotheslines – Support System For The Affordable Solar Panel

Clothesline SeasonFor all of the enviro-babble, green-washings and Copenhagen’s, Jubbling believes the best way to reduce our impact on the environment is by thinking small and a great place to start is with clotheslines. That’s right, clotheslines – a rope tied between 2 trees or a rope spanning your balcony – the clothesline is making a comeback and these solar panel supports are affordable and effective. Our clothesline is made out of an old phone extension cord and by using it from May through Sept 2009, we were able to drop our power consumption by over 10%; the period when electrical rates are at their highest. And should your neighbors complain, show them the thong you didn’t hang up on the clothesline and I think they’ll reconsider.

Give it a try and time it to cover a billing cycle with your electric company. I think you’ll like the results. And remember, we’re not asking you to do anything extreme like washing your clothes in a river. It’s just a clothesline and the past stigma associated with hanging your clothes outside will be replaced with the pride you feel at your lower energy bills and the adoration you receive from your neighbors.

Some sites to check out include: ClothelinesSource.com or Urban Clotheslines.

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