Thank You China. You Saved Philip Morris In The 80’s When We Stopped Smoking And Now You Want The Coal We’re Not Burning.

Burning Coal SucksGreat article from e360.com about the US lessening its dependence on coal and how China’s need is increasing. The author does a great job comparing the US’s reduced consumption of coal in the 2000’s to shrinking sales of cigarettes in the 1980’s and how the expanding Chinese market will bail US companies out for a second time.

As our consumption decreases, US coal mining companies are increasing their sales into China by land transporting and then shipping millions of tons of the fossil fuel. The growth of coal exports into China will require the building of new West coast ports dedicated to shipping this fossil fuel and that’s where the environmental opposition comes in. [e360.com]

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Geothermal Power Isn’t As Sexy As Solar Or Wind And That’s Why It May Be The Most Promising

SMU Geothermal Laboratory and Google.org
Enhanced Geothermal SystemsGoogle and SMU recently completed a study to more accurately determine how much energy could be generated using geothermal sources under the US. This is SMU’s Geothermal Laboratory’s third study on the availability geothermal and their results are pretty amazing – the geothermal potential under the US is nearly 3 million megawatts, or 10 times the amount of power produced by coal plants today. Even crazier is that the geothermal energy potential under West Virginia is greater than what the state could generate annually from coal.

Geothermal is kind of the Ugly Betty on the renewable energy scene and much like the fullback in football. Never glamorous, it rarely gets the same attention as cool solar or sleek wind turbines. Non-glamorous Iceland has found a way to harness its geothermal resources and they currently get 53% of their primary energy from the hot stuff – when will we? [TPM]

For more information, check out A New Geothermal Map of the United States and A Googol of Heat Beneath Our Feet

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