The Sunset House Cabin Is Built Out Of Reuse, Reclaim, Recycle, Repurpose, Re-Everything!

The Sunset House - Reclaim, Reuse, Repurposed Cabin In West Virginia.The Sunset House is Jubbling at its most awesome. From Cabin Porn:

“The Sunset House in southern West Virginia was built by Lilah and Nick using lumber reclaimed from a barn on their property which was cut and milled from the land by the previous owner many years ago. All the windows are reclaimed from junkyards over their history of thrifting together.”

To view more images of the Sunset House, check out Old World Grange. [Cabin Porn]

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Lessons Learned From Eco-Cities In China.

Tianjin Eco-City Tianjin Eco-City - Solar panels in front of building.Wouldn’t it be great if we could have a do-over? China has been looking to redo by re-thinking their future cities and developing eco-cities like Tianjin Eco-city. When it’s complete some time after 2020, Tianjin Eco-city will be home to 350,000 residents where 90% of in-city travel can be accomplished by foot, bike or public transportation. Green buildings will be the norm and renewable power will supply 15% of the eco-city’s electricity needs. What’s the motivation? From the NY Times:

“Today, facing challenges like runaway urbanization, soaring energy consumption and environmental degradation, China is hoping to establish a different set of paragons. With its cities expected to swell by another 350 million residents in the next 25 years, according to World Bank estimates, the government is scurrying to find sustainable urban solutions. To that end, it hopes to have 100 model cities, 200 model counties, 1,000 model districts and 10,000 model towns by 2015.”

One interesting fact about the Tianjin Eco-city project is that when construction started in 2008, EV charging stations where never included in the plans. Maybe a good lesson that can be learned from China’s experience is to build future eco-cities that are simple and flexible. They didn’t plan for electric vehicles and now, just like every non eco-city, they have to update their infrastructure to account for them.

Check out the NYT article for more information on the goals and challenges of building an eco-city. [NY Times]

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How Can A New Sports Arena Be ‘Eco-Friendly’ When There’s An Existing Arena Right Down The Street?

Eco Friendly SODO Arena designSeattle sports fans are in a frenzy about professional basketball possibly returning to the Emerald City. Chris Hansen is leading the effort and contingent to bringing an NBA basketball team back is building a new $490 million arena for the franchise in Seattle’s SODO (South Downtown) district. The proposed arena has gone through many changes and the latest design from 360 Architecture is being billed as “eco-friendly.” Here are some of the SODO Arena’s eco-specs (from Seattle Times):

“The architects for investor Chris Hansen on Tuesday also outlined ideas to make the facility environmentally sustainable, from capturing and reusing rainwater to solar heating and generating energy for the surrounding neighborhood.”

All great and definitely better than not having eco-features but it’s still tough for me to buy into this arena because Seattle already has the Key Arena that was renovated in 1995.Key Arena Seattle The 17,000 seat Key Arena has been hosting all levels of basketball, hockey and concerts since the NBA Sonics left in 2008. A little scrub and polish and the Key would be more than adequate to host a NBA team again.

Eco-friendly’ing up the proposed SODO Arena is wonderful. So what would bringing professional basketball back to Seattle and using the existing Key Arena? That would be Jubbling. [Seattle Times]

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Explosion-Free Building Demolition.

The time-lapse video is of the 456′ Grand Prince Hotel Akasaka slowly being demolished in Japan.

Taisei Corporation's Tecorep high-rise dismantling systemDeveloped by Taisei Corporation of Japan, the Taisei Ecological Reproduction System (Tecorep) dismantles skyscrapers instead of using explosives to bring them down. From Taisei:

“This revolutionary new system enables systematic disassembly of high-rise buildings and allows reuse of the disassembled construction materials. In addition, the energy generated by lowering materials to ground level is used to offset overall CO2 emissions.”

And from the Huffington Post, here’s how the Tecorep works:

“Inside the building, jacks support the roof as floors are demolished from the top down, while an internal crane lowers materials and debris to the ground floor.”

If you’ve ever watched a building demolition live, you have a good idea of how much dust, fiberglass and who knows what else is spewed out.

Back in 2000 and during a moment of genius, I convinced my pregnant wife that we should take our one year-old son to go watch the Kingdome implosion. Compare the video above with the Kingdome implosion below:

Despite being a half-mile away, we had to run to get away from the fiberglass (asbestos?) infused dust cloud. It wasn’t a proud parenting moment.

I don’t think the Tecorep dismantling technique would’ve worked on the Kingdome but for a standard high-rise, it could be the most efficient and least wasteful method for bringing down a building. Of course “least wasteful” would only apply if there is sufficient reason to dismantle the building in the first place. [HuffPo]

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The Bone House In Texas Is More Jubbling Than We’ll Ever Be.

I’m not sure I’d want to live in The Bone House but the Jubbling is undeniable. Built by Dan Phillips and his team from Phoenix Commotion, The Bone House is constructed out of normally discarded CD’s, lumber, mirror pieces, bottle caps, grocery bags and of course bones. It’s part of Mr. Phillips’ effort to build low income housing out of trash. Throughout the video, you’ll hear a cat interrupting the interview by meowing. Obviously the cat has no idea how close it is to being incorporated into the house. [Fair Companies]

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Wireless Companies Want To Build More Cell Transmitters Into Existing Church Steeples, Bell Towers And Crosses.

Cell transmitters and towers built into existing church bell towers, steeples and crosses.Moving forward, how will wireless companies reduce the cost and number of newly-built cell transmitters in restrictive communities? By embedding cell transmitters into the steeples, crosses and bell towers of neighborhood churches.

Moving forward, how will churches attract more members to their congregation? By providing the best cell signal in the neighborhood. [LA Times]

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