Drink Your Soup And Then Eat Your Spoon With Triangle Tree’s Edible Spoon.

Edible Spoon from Triangle Tree.

Why not? Triangle Tree’s Edible Spoon makes it easier to enjoy a to-go meal with less waste. The Edible Spoon comes in 3 flavors – plain, spicy, and sweet. Eating your Edible Spoon’able meal out of an edible Edibowl is an unbeatable Jubbling moment. Need a napkin? Use your shirt. [Laughing Squid]

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Upcycling A Pizza Box.

The Buzzfeed article states differently but I’m pretty sure these upcycled pizza box ideas assume you don’t have the cheese-grease stain that kept you from recycling the pizza box in the first place.

Pizza box cat bed

Pizza box cat bed (click on the image for instructions)

Pizza box solar-powered s'mores oven.

Pizza box solar-powered s'mores oven. (click on image for instructions)

Pizza box birds nest.

Pizza box birds nest. (click on the image for instructions)

Upcycled pizza box Battleship game.

Upcycled pizza box Battleship game. (click on the image for instructions)

What can you do with a cheese-grease stained pizza box? Rip-off and recycle the unstained lid and then save the lower cheese-greased section as a fire starter. Additional upcycled pizza box ideas are posted on Buzzfeed.


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Ecover Will Be Partially Packaging Their Products With Plastic Retrieved From The Sea. Good Idea?

Plastic bottle in the oceanBased in Belgium, Ecover manufactures natural cleaning products primarily for the European market. They are like the United States’ Method brand – which they own. Ecover is always working on improving the sustainability of their products and their latest effort is to harvest sea-plastic from the ocean and incorporate it into their packaging. The sea-plastic will be mixed with a plastic made from sugar cane (PlantPlastic) and other recycled plastic to create a new one-of-a-kind packaging. Here’s how Ecover will recover and recycle the sea-plastic (Guardian):

“Boats outfitted with special equipment will be able to collect between two and eight tonnes of waste per trawl for cleaning and recycling, while other fishermen will collect plastic debris mixed with by-catch and deposit it at special collection points. The sorted waste will then be sent to Closed Loop Recycling’s plant in Dagenham, east London, where it will be processed and turned into the plastic for the new bottles.”

Reducing the amount of plastic in our oceans and creating awareness of the ocean garbage patches are all good things but I just can’t get past the idea of sending fuel-guzzling fishing boats out to trawl the ocean bottom for plastic. Maybe they’ll just skim the surface for floating plastic – still, it seems like an extremely consuming way to make a statement about ocean pollution and the sustainability of your product. Wouldn’t it be less consuming and less labor intensive to harvest the plastic on land before it reaches the ocean?

What do you think? [Guardian]


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The Sunset House Cabin Is Built Out Of Reuse, Reclaim, Recycle, Repurpose, Re-Everything!

The Sunset House - Reclaim, Reuse, Repurposed Cabin In West Virginia.The Sunset House is Jubbling at its most awesome. From Cabin Porn:

“The Sunset House in southern West Virginia was built by Lilah and Nick using lumber reclaimed from a barn on their property which was cut and milled from the land by the previous owner many years ago. All the windows are reclaimed from junkyards over their history of thrifting together.”

To view more images of the Sunset House, check out Old World Grange. [Cabin Porn]

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2.5 Million Kilograms Of CO2 Emitted Just Getting To Conference On Climate Change In Davos Switzerland.

Kloster Ski Resort at Davos SwitzerlandOne more screwed up example of “do as we say, not as we do” environmentalism. From Grist:

“The 2,630 attendees cumulatively traveled over 550,000 kilometers by plane; in doing so, they generated 2.47 million kilograms of carbon dioxide. 2,470 metric tons. Add in train travel — 57,860 more kilograms — and the total footprint for those jetting in to Davos is 2,520 metric tons of carbon dioxide.”

The Grist article points out that maybe we could excuse the carbon emissions created by world leaders and CEOs to attend the WEF Conference because their intentions, reducing the use of fossil fuels, are for the greater good. But I’m not buying it and I wouldn’t be surprised if a few attendees wore their ski boots to a meeting so they could cut out the middle step, changing, and go right to the slopes.

In a past career, I had to pick tradeshows to attend and the weather and location were very important factors. That’s why I wouldn’t be surprised if the primary motivation of leaders attending this conference was to expense a ski vacation in Switzerland and not tackling climate change. It’s hard to not be cynical but these kind of forums / events play right into the hands of FOX News. They’re chomping at the bit to show how hypocritical it is to host a conference on climate change that furthers climate change. [Grist]

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Some Eco-Friendly Alternatives To Your Traditional Christmas Tree Are Not Very Cash-Friendly To Your Wallet.

One Two Tree.Cut Christmas trees and Halloween pumpkins share a common afterlife – they both have a meaningful place in our home for a short period of time and then they’re both hastily discarded. That’s why finding a lasting alternative to the traditional Christmas tree is so important.

Jubiltree Non-Traditional Christmas Tree Alternative.Inhabitat’s article, “14 Eco-Friendly Design Alternatives to the Traditional Christmas Tree,” was well-researched, timely and offered eco’ish alternatives to traditional Christmas trees but the prices can get more pretty crazy. Granted, a few of the smaller non-traditional tree options sell in the $20 range but four of the models listed in the artcle are priced above $349 and the wooden Jubiltree* eclipses the $500 mark. I may be wrong but I don’t think unreasonably over-priced alt-Christmas trees are going to change buying habits.

That’s why Jubbling would like to help you find reusable Christmas tree options that won’t crush your bank account and can be sourced locally. Our two reusable picks are the potted living Christmas tree and a used plastic tree from your local Goodwill store.

Going with a reusable potted living Christmas tree ($50-75) requires some management but it’s a great option for people who prefer an un-dead natural tree. If you’re ok with a plastic one, Goodwill has an assortment of previously-loved options in the $5-20 price range. Ideally, purchasing a used plastic tree means another new one will not be manufactured.

Consumers shouldn’t have to spend $500 on a eco-suavé Christmas tree alternative in order to gain some green street cred. Reusable Christmas trees that are wallet-friendly and match your preference (natural or artificial) are available and you don’t have to travel very far to find one. [Inhabitat]


*Jubiltree and Jubbling are not related.

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