Artsy Wall Of Birdhouses Made From Recycled Materials May Not Be A Good Idea.

Thank you Gizmodo and Andrew Liszewski for coming up with the best article headline of the week:

Wall of birdhouses.

From the article:

“So while this artsy initiative [Happy City Birds] that turns recycled materials into birdhouses sounds like a lovely way to spruce up a neighborhood, it’s hard to imagine the deafening racket coming from this wall. The deafening racket or the mountain of crap that’s going to end up on the sidewalk below.”

Building birdhouses out of recycled materials is good. Extreme isn’t. [Gizmodo]

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Wasteful Art Again: “The Cure For Greed” Injection Kit By Diddo Is Just Plain Stupiddo.

Art is busting my chops again! Designer/artist Diddo is making a bold statement with his “The Cure For Greed” injection kit:

‘The Cure For Greed’ injection kit features a 24-karat gold plated syringe and a single 5 ml dose of dollar ink recovered from approximately $10,000 in US currency.

You’ll have to head over to Diddo’s website to better understand the motivation for his “The Cure for Greed” injection kit. I tried to read his manifesto but halfway through, I barfed on myself. (Didn’t call it art.)

Making an artistic statement about greed by being so unnecessarily wasteful is just plain crazy. Sorry art, you lost me again. [Buzzfeed]

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Jason Lloyd Fletcher’s Genevieve Sustainable Side Table And Chair Made Out Of Vintage Belts. What The What?

Jason Lloyd Fletcher vintage belt made chair and tableJason Lloyd Fletcher used recycled vintage belts to build his Genevieve series of side tables and chairs. From his website:

“Genevieve is a series of handmade pieces representing luxury products with sustainable, ethical principles.”

Really? Sustainable and ethical? I’m sorry but taking a crapload of perfectly wearable belts and turning them into furniture does not sound very sustainable. Creating usable products out of things we normally throw out and you have something. Not belts!

So if you are lucky enough to be in possession of a Jason Lloyd Fletcher designed Genevieve side table or chair, please dismantle it and re-recycle the vintage belts. Congratulations, you now have a lifetime supply of vintage belts or future belt gifts for your friends and family.

Going a little further, you could also walk around town handing out belts to people who can’t, and want to, keep their pants from falling down. They’ll call you Belt-Man and you’ll be a local hero. [Inhabitat]

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Google’s Self-Driving Cars Are Now Legal On California’s Roads.

Google Autonomous CarThis is a good thing, making the autonomous Google car street legal in California, right?

Google’s autonomous cars operate through the use of computers, lasers and sensors allowing the driver to be a passenger. The goal of the Google car is to improve safety, reduce congestion, and improve fuel efficiency. Sounds like mass transit… less the computers, lasers, sensors and having another vehicle on the road. [Inhabitat]

Jubbling: Consuming less should be less consuming.


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Plant Host Drone (PHD) Lets Your Plants Follow The Sunlight. Still Gets A Damn Unnecessary Machine (DUM) From Jubbling.

Plant Host Drone (PHD)Don’t get me wrong, the Plant Host Drone (PHD) is a neat project and its creator, Belgian sculptor Stephen Verstraete, is more talented asleep than I am awake. I just hope people don’t consider putting their houseplants on autonomous, battery-powered vehicles that follow the sunlight a viable product. Even if the PHD served double duty and dragged a cat toy around the room as it moved, it still wouldn’t make the Jubbling cut. It’s a greenie “fishing with hand grenades” kind of idea. [Gizmag]


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Oh Nuts! There’s Some Soup In My Sand….Made Bowl.

Victor Castanera Sandstone bowlsThis story goes in the green file folder labeled “I don’t think so.” Barcelona designer Victor Castanera creates his Sandstone bowls out of an acrylic resin and uses beach sand as his mold; no machinery. On his website, Mr. Castanera explains the process [Google translated]:

“The project aims to emphasize the importance of the production process for both the final product, which acquires a unique identity resulting from a decision of Nature, and the user who made ​​that experience with them from the time throwing water on the sand until they have to give at home use.”

This would be fun to project to do with the kids but are these Sandstone bowls usable? Sustainable? Would you use a Sandstone bowl more than once? Probably not. [Inhabitat]

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