Home Energy Efficiency (1993 vs 2009): Homes Are More Efficient, Gadgets/Electronics More Prevalent.

Home Energy Consumption chart from the EIAI think this home energy consumption chart shows what we call a hug-punch or a tickle-slap – homes are more efficient through weatherization [the hug] but we’re eating up those savings with our appliances, gadgets and electronics [the punch]. According to an article on Greentech, homes built between 2000-2009 were 30% larger than previous years and yet home energy consumption has stayed pretty much flat. We must be buying a shitload of appliances, gadgets and electronics because Energy Star can’t save us.

Even as we move towards efficient home appliances, we seem to be over complicating it. We posted a story about WiFi controlled LED lighting system that allowed homeowners to remotely control their lights via a remote, iDevice app and required a separate router. It’s the hardware stupid! Since most of us have mastered the on/off switch – use it and skip the energy consuming gadgets in order to truly save electricity. [Greentech Media]

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Find Ways To Avoid Using Your Clothes Dryer.

Energy Stars vs WannabeGreentech posted the article “Clothes Dryers May Use 35% More Energy Than Advertised” that highlighted the fact that clothes dryers have not received an Energy Star rating yet and may consume even more power than posted on the appliance. Current dryer tests use dampened napkin-size polyester-cotton blended cloths, not heavy cottons, to measure how efficiently a tested clothes dryer removes moisture. In addition, the tests do not capture data as to when each individual dryer automatically shuts-off based on detected fabric moisture levels which is another measure of how one clothes dryer would consume more/less power than another model.

Testing aside, clothes dryer’s account for 4% of the total residential energy use in the United States and Jubbling thinks the best way to reduce that percentage is to avoid their use. Here are some tips on how to avoid using the clothes dryer during the fall/winter seasons:

  1. Santa shorts hanging on a clothesline.Do Your Laundry Based On The Weather Forecast: Just because it’s getting colder doesn’t mean you can’t use your outdoor clothesline. Wait for an above freezing sunny day to do your laundry and let the dry cool air do the work of your dryer.

  2. Hang Clothes Inside: Most home thermostats are set between 65 – 72 degrees which is warm enough to dry your clothes indoors. Hang them over your washer/dryer, bathroom or anywhere you have a rod installed. Looks redneck but so what. Note: avoid hanging your clothes near your kitchen or they’ll end up smelling like last night’s dinner.

  3. Mr. Mom Flannel ShirtWear Your Clothes Multiple Times Between Washings: It’s colder out and you don’t sweat as much. Take this as a challenge and see how many days you can wear the same outfit – especially if you’re married and you no longer impress your spouse.

  4. Wear Less Heavy Cottons Clothing Or Just Wear Them As Outerwear: Heavy cottons are a pain in the ass to dry. But if you like to wear heavy cottons, don’t let them touch your skin and wear them repeatedly between washing/drying (refer back to reason #3 about not impressing your spouse for extra motivation).

Clip-n-Drip clothes dryerI’d recommend using the clothes dryer for socks and underwear to lessen the amount of time you have to spend and to keep space open for larger items. Or you could go with a clip-n-drip solution that’ll hold multiple small items for air drying. [Greentech]

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