Fiji Water Closes Plant To Protest Tax Hike And Then Re-Opens It 48 Hours Later.

Inspired by an article on Greenbiz.com.

Fiji Water closed their water plant this last Monday and then re-opened it 2 days later after agreeing to a portion of the Fijian government’s tax hike request – it’s now at $.08/liter. The tax goes into effect in 2011 and will generate $12 million in additional tax revenue for Fiji. Fiji Water has been a huge target for the anti-bottled water movement and they’ve responded with their own facts about the importance of Fiji Water to the nation of Fiji.

Fiji Water has gained a following by positioning their product as a premium bottled water and in my opinion, it’s up to you whether you buy it or not. I personally think it’s crazy to consider paying $4-5 per liter for water that is shipped from a country that I’d like to see but can’t afford to visit; especially when all I need to do is turn on my tap to get the nutritional and taste equivalent at a fraction of the cost.

Here again is a hilarious video from Penn & Teller “The Truth About Bottled Water”.

[youtube width=”376″ height=”300″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hiem5EJaLus&feature=related[/youtube]

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The Story Of Bottle Water With Annie Leonard

The Story Of Bottled Water” is the latest video from Annie Leonard and the team that created The Story About Stuff video in 2007.

The Story Of Bottled Water follows the rise and acceptance of bottle water as a pseudo healthier alternative to tap water. And the video highlights bottled water’s success as a perfect example of manufactured demand; corporations playing into our fears and selling us on products we don’t need and/or already have. The video’s message is simple and encourages people to reconsider their next purchase of bottled water in favor of normal everyday tap water. In many cases, tap water scores higher than bottled water in quality and blind taste tests.

[youtube width=”480″ height=”289″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Se12y9hSOM0[/youtube]

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Hello Brita Filter and Preserve Products. Goodbye Arrowhead, Crystal Springs, Dasani, Evian, Fiji, …

Mr. McGuire: I want to say one word to you. Just one word.
Benjamin: Yes, sir.
Mr. McGuire: Are you listening?
Benjamin: Yes, I am.
Mr. McGuire: Plastics.
Benjamin: Just how do you mean that, sir?

In case you didn’t know, Benjamin is Dustin Hoffman’s character in the movie The Graduate from 1967. Today Benjamin wouldn’t be so confused about the role of plastics in our lives and nowhere is it more prevalent than in the form of the plastic water bottle.

Brita Water Filter OptionsI’d like to think that Benjamin was a conscientious person and that maybe he would have landed a job with the Brita Water Filtration Systems Company. By now you’ve probably seen their clear plastic pitchers hanging out in your friend’s fridge, or maybe you own one like me. Brita’s plastic filters reduce your tap water’s chlorine taste and remove mercury via the carbon bits stuffed inside. But what do you do with the filter after it has served its purpose and needs replacing? To solve this question, Brita partnered with Boston-based Preserve, a 13-year-old company that makes house wares from recycled plastics. You may be wondering how this translates into Jubbling?

Jubbling starts when the consumer uses their tap water instead of bottled water. This reduces plastic bottle waste in landfills. It also lessens overall impact stemming from the transportation and warehousing of bottled water, including the fuel consumption and emissions produced when bringing it to the marketplace.

Preserve Products Gimme-5 ProgramThe Double-Jubbling, if you will, is fulfilled when the pitcher filters are further recycled into other items like toothbrushes and cutting boards via Preserve’s recycling process.. Preserve is currently promoting their Gimme 5 Program, which offers consumers drop-off locations, like Whole Foods Markets, as well as mailing instructions for used filters. The number five refers to the No. 5 polypropylene plastic (the number is found inside the small triangle on the bottom or side of some plastic containers) used in the Brita filter’s design. Apparently, not many municipalities accept this type in their recycling programs so this program keeps those items from filling up landfills.

What is incredible here is that we’re seeing three life-cycles of useful products. First is the pitcher filter, second is the new Preserve product created from recycled filters and the third use comes from recycling the second product after its lifespan is done. What do you call already good Jubbling that has been tweaked for increased benefit? Is it a Double-Jubbling? Maybe it’s a Redundant Jubbling, or Jubbling To The Third Degree? I’m not sure but this idea holds huge potential for reducing consumer impact and even calming the future concerns of present-day Benjamins all around the world.

Benjamin: I’m just…
Mr. Braddock: Worried?
Benjamin: Well…
Mr. Braddock: About what?
Benjamin: I guess about my future.
Mr. Braddock: What about it?
Benjamin: I don’t know… I want it to be…
Mr. Braddock: To be what?
Benjamin: [looks at his father] … Different.


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