Human Powered Ferris Wheel In Myanmar. [Video]

Human powered ferris wheel in Myanmar.

From the YouTube description:

“Movie was made at Luna park in Yangon (capitol of Myanmar) in January 2013. I could not believe my eyes to see man’s muscle power made a ferris wheel work. The height of the wheel was 10-15 meters. A few young men went to the top of the wheel. They climbed there without any safety protections. They were barefooted or wore flip-flops. At the top they stared to move one direction. The move made the wheel work slowly. When they reached the bottom of the wheel they jumped on the ground. Generally they were as agile as a monkey. Some strong and fit men speeded up ferris wheel. It was also stopped by man hands. Fuel cell generator made only lights work.”

Could it work here in the US? Have you been to a county fair lately? [Arbroath]

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Animal Planet’s ‘Eating The Enemy’ – Watch STRETCH Turn Invasive Species Into Flavorful Meals.

Animal Planet's Eating the Enemy.A good watch is the Animal Planet’s new show “Eating the Enemy.” The show’s premise is simple – send restaurant owner STRETCH into an area dealing with an invasive species (asian carp and wild boar) and he’ll develop a menu item using it. STRETCH doesn’t create the entree on his own; he meets with local chefs to discover the seasonings to use, helps catch the main course and then prepares a meal at a local restaurant hoping they’ll add it to their menu. In the first episode, STRETCH makes sliders using asian carp (or “Bayou bass”) as his main ingredient. I didn’t watch the second episode about hunting and preparing wild boars in Texas.

If you get a chance, check out “Eating the Enemy.” The show next airs on December 31st. A nice bonus of the show is that they cut to the chase and keep it to 30 minutes. [Animal Planet]

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The Napsack From Poler Is A Coat And A Sleeping Bag.

The Napsack from Poler Stuff.

“The Napsack has zippers at the shoulders, so you can stick your arms out, and a cinch at the bottom so that you can open it up and stick your legs out. Hike it up to your waist, cinch it, and wear it like a puffy coat around the campfire, and then crawl right back into your tent without ever having to leave the warmth of your bag.”
The Napsack product description on PolerStuff.com

Like a successful mullet, The Napsack serves two purposes: coat by day and sleeping bag at night. Watch your peephole Inuit-inspired bodysuit from Femke Agema. [Gizmodo]

Inuit-inspired bodysuit from Femke Agema.

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