What To Do With Your Jack O’ Lantern After Halloween.

Sad rotting Jack O' Lantern wishes he were a pie.

"Wish I were a pie."

In addition to sharing a short 3 week lifespan, Jack O’ Lanterns and Christmas trees also share a disposal problem. Once your pumpkin is carved, post Halloween uses for your Jack O’ Latern are limited. So we searched around to find simple alternatives to throwing your briefly-loved Jack O’ Lantern into the trash and here’s our list:

    1. Bury Jack: the easiest non-garbage option is to bury Jack somewhere in your yard.
    2. Compost Jack: cut him up first and then dump his remains in the compost bin.
    3. Pickle Jack’s rind: if it’s relatively fresh. (Not doing this.)
    4. Feed Jack to chickens: chickens would love to eat Jack. Give him to a neighbor with chickens or take him to a local farm.

Another option is to have your kids paint a face on the pumpkin, instead of carving, and then shine a light on it. When Halloween is over, you’ll have a non-rotting and intact pumpkin that the chef in your house can go nuts with preparing soups, desserts etc.

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Halloween Candy: Whatever You Do, Don’t Hand Out Toothpaste Or Advice!

Last year, we performed a very un-scientific taste test of some natural Halloween candy from the Natural Candy Store.

Halloween - Don't Piss Them Off!About this time every year, the green websites offer ideas on how to Hallowgreen it up. The costume swaps are great but whatever you do, please don’t screw around too much with the idea of handing out Halloween candy. The web is abuzz with food and non-food alternatives to old school candy and here are some selected suggestions from Greenhalloween.org:

  • Acorns (from a tree)
  • Individually wrapped organic herbal tea bags
  • Jokes
  • Toothpaste
  • Soap
  • Seashells

Hand out any of these items and you can bet they’re going to either find the trash or be thrown back at your house in a barrage of eggs that are not organic or cage-free. It makes me wonder, what’s worse: handing out eco-unfriendly Hershey’s chocolate bars that will be consumed or tea bags that will likely find the garbage bin? [Read more…]

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Green Halloween’s National Costume Swap Day Is October 13, 2012.

Four Loko Halloween Costume.Green Halloween’s National Costume Swap Day is one of the best reuse/reduce/recycle events of the year. All you have to do is visit their website and by state, find the closest participating store. Anytime between now and October 13, you can drop in and donate your previously loved Halloween costumes. Each store is offering some type of incentive (goodie bag, discount coupons etc.) for donating your old costumes and you’ll receive a ticket to the costume swap on Saturday, October 13. [National Costume Swap Day via Inhabitots]

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Halloween Candy: Whatever You Do, Don’t Hand Out Agave Nectar Sticks Or Advice!

Halloween - Don't Piss Them Off!About this time every year, the green websites offer ideas on how to Hallowgreen it up. The costume swaps are great but whatever you do, please don’t screw around too much with the idea of handing out Halloween candy. The web is abuzz with food and non-food alternatives to old school candy and here are some selected suggestions from Greenhalloween.org:

  • Acorns (from a tree)
  • Individually wrapped organic herbal tea bags
  • Jokes
  • Toothpaste
  • Soap
  • Seashells

Hand out any of these items and you can bet they’re going to either find the trash or be thrown back at your house in a barrage of eggs that are not organic or cage-free. It makes me wonder, what’s worse: handing out eco-unfriendly Hershey’s chocolate bars that will be consumed or tea bags that will likely find the garbage bin?

That’s why we decided to do a little research and find some cost effective Halloween candy that could appease our kid’s need for treats, come in bulk, and still be a little Jubbling. We ordered our sample from the Natural Candy Store and then hired a panel of experts in the field of Halloween candy for their opinion. Our results:

endangered species chocolate
Endangered Species Chocolate
Price: $6.95 for 21 pieces
Endangered Species Chocolate: “100% ethically traded. We buy our cocoa from small family-owned properties, helping sustain the habitats and communities in which they exist. 10% of profits to animal habitat and humanity causes.”
Ingredients: Chocolate, milk, beet sugar, cocoa butter, lactose, soy lecithin and vanilla.
Candy Experts: Expert 1: Awesome.
Expert 2: Better than real chocolate (expert a little confused).
Expert 3: Can I have another one?


Mini Glee Gum Mix
Glee Gum
Price: $5.99 for 20 Mini Packs
Glee Gum: “Natural chewing gum made with sustainably harvested rainforest chicle.”
Ingredients: Cane sugar, glucose, gum base, rice syrup, orange oil, black carrot or black current for color etc.
Candy Experts: Expert 1: Hard to start but fine.
Expert 2: Flavor lasts as long as real gum (same expert as above).
Expert 3: I don’t want to try it.


YummyEarth Lollipops Mix
YummyEarth Lollipops
Price: $3.99 for 33 lollipops
YummyEarth: “We proudly handcraft 21 delicious flavors with real fruit extracts – no corn syrup or artificial ingredients.”
Ingredients: Organic evap. cane juice, rice syrup, citric acid, natural flavors etc.
Candy Experts: Expert 1: More flavor than normal lollipop.
Expert 2: Best of all the candies.
Expert 3: Yum.


Surf Sweets Organic Gummy Bears
Surf Sweet Gummy Bears
Price: $7.49 for 10 mini-packs
Surf Sweets: “Organically-sweetened gummy candies are drenched in fresh fruit flavor and free of artificial colors and sweeteners.”
Ingredients: Organic tapioca syrup, organic evap. cane juice, gelatin, grape juice etc.
Candy Experts: Expert 1: Harder than gummy bears I’m used to but good.
Expert 2: Best of all the candies (two bests?).
Expert 3: No thank you.


Ultimately, Jubbling really doesn’t care if you hand out Hershey’s or endangered species chocolate – you’re going to do what works best for you. But please don’t hand out seashells, tea bags or jokes. Halloween is a great day to meet your neighbors; not a day to be a dong and hand out acorns.

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