Some Eco-Friendly Alternatives To Your Traditional Christmas Tree Are Not Very Cash-Friendly To Your Wallet.

One Two Tree.Cut Christmas trees and Halloween pumpkins share a common afterlife – they both have a meaningful place in our home for a short period of time and then they’re both hastily discarded. That’s why finding a lasting alternative to the traditional Christmas tree is so important.

Jubiltree Non-Traditional Christmas Tree Alternative.Inhabitat’s article, “14 Eco-Friendly Design Alternatives to the Traditional Christmas Tree,” was well-researched, timely and offered eco’ish alternatives to traditional Christmas trees but the prices can get more pretty crazy. Granted, a few of the smaller non-traditional tree options sell in the $20 range but four of the models listed in the artcle are priced above $349 and the wooden Jubiltree* eclipses the $500 mark. I may be wrong but I don’t think unreasonably over-priced alt-Christmas trees are going to change buying habits.

That’s why Jubbling would like to help you find reusable Christmas tree options that won’t crush your bank account and can be sourced locally. Our two reusable picks are the potted living Christmas tree and a used plastic tree from your local Goodwill store.

Going with a reusable potted living Christmas tree ($50-75) requires some management but it’s a great option for people who prefer an un-dead natural tree. If you’re ok with a plastic one, Goodwill has an assortment of previously-loved options in the $5-20 price range. Ideally, purchasing a used plastic tree means another new one will not be manufactured.

Consumers shouldn’t have to spend $500 on a eco-suavé Christmas tree alternative in order to gain some green street cred. Reusable Christmas trees that are wallet-friendly and match your preference (natural or artificial) are available and you don’t have to travel very far to find one. [Inhabitat]


*Jubiltree and Jubbling are not related.

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Promised My Cats The Sky Scratcher™: New York City Scratching Post For Christmas…Then Saw The Price.

The Sky Scratcher™: New York City cat scratching post.The Sky Scratcher™: New York City scratching post for cats is a green idea that is gluelessly made out of 120 stories of recycled cardboard and renewable bamboo plywood. And the creators of The Sky Scratcher™ go even further by donating a portion of their sales to help feed and assists pets that were affected by Hurricane Sandy. Awesome2 until I saw the $149 price tag. Sorry cats but your getting the usual empty box to play in, one shiny Christmas ornament to break and I promise not to have you de-clawed for another year. [Etsy via Inhabitat]

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The Holiday Vegetable Loaf Was Tofurkying Up Thanksgiving Decades Before Tofurky!

Holiday Vegetable Loaf: The Mother of all Tofurkys.Who would’ve thought that working down the food chain and going veggie was happening long before it was cool. Not sure how quickly I’d pounce on this meatless Holiday Vegetable Loaf but I do like that it’s on a bed of mashed potatoes. Have a wonderful Thanksgiving and enjoy your leftovers – XO XO Jubbling. [Boing Boing]

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This Thanksgiving, 203 Million Pounds Of Edible Turkey Meat Will Be Thrown Out.

Thanksgiving turkey waste

“Why do we have to eat turkey at Thanksgiving? Why can’t we have chicken katsu instead?
Harry, November 19, 2012


For my son Harry, turkey meat can best be described as his barf-inducing kryptonite and it turns out that he’s not the only one avoiding turkey at Thanksgiving. According to US Department of Agriculture figures, US consumers throw out a crazy 203 million pounds (35%) of edible turkey meat each Thanksgiving. Yes we could all make more of an effort to NOT throw out our leftover turkey by saving fridge/freezer space for it in advance or by purchasing a smaller bird. But if Harry could decide, we’d dump the turkey altogether and switch to a Thanksgiving chicken. USDA numbers support this move by showing that Americans throw out 15% of the edible chicken meat – 60% less waste than turkey***.

Hopefully Harry won’t use this data and throw Jubbling back in my face in order to make his case for Thanksgiving chicken. He may be successful because having Jubbling thrown back at me is my kryptonite. [UPI.com]


***Sorry vegetarians and vegans. I couldn’t find numbers on Tofurky.

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If Thanksgiving Had A Groin, It Just Got Kicked By Black Thursday Sales.

Black Friday sales are nuts and retailers agreed. How did they cure the crazy? They moved the mayhem to Thursday night – Thanksgiving! Here’s a short-list of stores bucking Black Friday for Thursday this year:

  • Wal-Mart – 8:00 PM on Thanksgiving Day
  • Sears – 8:00 PM on Thanksgiving Day
  • Toys R Us – 8:00 PM on Thanksgiving Day
  • Target – 9:00 PM on Thanksgiving Day

Black Thursday will be a success and people will gladly forgo an opportunity to relax and spend a peaceful Thanksgiving together in order to get a great deal on a Furby or LeapPad2. It’ll be another win for retail and consumption unless consumers decide this is too much and avoid the Black Friday Thursday sales.

So please stay home, watch some of the Black Friday videos from last year and be thankful. The more we attend these unnecessary events, the earlier in the year they’ll get. Black Halloween – your next. [Gizmodo]

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What To Do With Your Jack O’ Lantern After Halloween.

Sad rotting Jack O' Lantern wishes he were a pie.

"Wish I were a pie."

In addition to sharing a short 3 week lifespan, Jack O’ Lanterns and Christmas trees also share a disposal problem. Once your pumpkin is carved, post Halloween uses for your Jack O’ Latern are limited. So we searched around to find simple alternatives to throwing your briefly-loved Jack O’ Lantern into the trash and here’s our list:

    1. Bury Jack: the easiest non-garbage option is to bury Jack somewhere in your yard.
    2. Compost Jack: cut him up first and then dump his remains in the compost bin.
    3. Pickle Jack’s rind: if it’s relatively fresh. (Not doing this.)
    4. Feed Jack to chickens: chickens would love to eat Jack. Give him to a neighbor with chickens or take him to a local farm.

Another option is to have your kids paint a face on the pumpkin, instead of carving, and then shine a light on it. When Halloween is over, you’ll have a non-rotting and intact pumpkin that the chef in your house can go nuts with preparing soups, desserts etc.

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