Shopping For Electronics? Best To Compare Price, Features And Planned Obsolescence Of Each Brand.

Electronic WasteWired posted an article, “Copyright and Planned Obsolescence: The Shady World of Repair Manuals,” about the need for free online product manuals and how it may conflict with a manufacturer’s copyrights – especially if the manufacturer prefers that you replace your electronic device rather than fix it. But is that in the manufacturer’s best interest?

Probably not and that’s why Jubbling decided to share our experience buying and selling electronics by offering some shopping tips:

  1. The savviest shoppers go to industry related blogs and find out how a future purchase performs. Following a thread is a great way to track defects and how they are handled by the manufacturer. Sample: home theater, cameras etc.
  2. Check IFixit for repairability information and manuals.
  3. If you’ve done your research and narrowed down your brand, contact the manufacturer or visit their website to find out if they have a local service center – especially for televisions. There’s nothing worse than re-boxing and shipping 42″ TV with a bad power supply across the country for repair.
  4. Make electronics purchases with American Express. Not only will AMEX add a year of warranty to the manufacturer’s standard warranty but if it breaks, they actually want to help you get it fixed.

Ultimately, it is in the best interest of electronics manufacturers to build a quality product so they will keep you as a customer for life. Offering service manuals online is a no-brainer and should have nothing to do with copyrights. Products should not be designed with planned obsolescence in mind – it’s not how you build brand loyalty.

As a kid, I remember my parents getting the call from Sears checking to see if we wanted to buy extended service contracts on their “almost out of warranty” appliances. The conversation went something like this:

Sears Rep: “Would like to buy an extended warranty on your Kenmore dishwasher?”


Parents: “No thank you.”


Sears Rep: “So what are you going to do if your dishwasher breaks outside of the warranty period and you’re not covered?”


Parents: “If we can’t get it repaired, I guess we’ll have to go out and buy another one. Only this time, we won’t be buying a Kenmore.”


Prior to ordering, Google your next electronics purchase by part # and put “repairs” at the end. And always keep in mind that the retailer isn’t concerned about the durability of the product you purchased. If it breaks, you’ll come back and buy a new one and your sales rep will get to say “chi-ching” as you walk out the door with your replacement purchase. (Don’t be a chi-ching.) [Wired]

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestmail