Potted “Living” Christmas Trees Redux

We decided to bring back the Potted Living Christmas Tree (PLCT) post from last year because it’s informative and out of a desperate need for content. This will be year six for our PLCT and unfortunately for my wife, it looks just as Charlie Brown’ish as it did last year.

Charlie Brown Christmas TreeWhen it comes to buying a Christmas tree, the decision for most is to choose between artificial or a barely dead tree. If you go artificial, you can get perfection every year and spend the holidays convincing everyone how close your artificial tree looks to an actual one. If you go to the Christmas tree lot and get a recently-departed tree, you can choose from a hundred or so trees and find the right height and fullness. You can even get it flocked on the spot if that’s your preference. Now Jubbling wants to recommend an alternative – the potted “living” Christmas tree.

A potted Christmas tree is exactly what the name suggests – take a trip to your local nursery and pick out a potted tree to use as your Christmas tree. Jubbling Christmas Tree According to our local nursery, Bainbridge Gardens, robust and durable types of living Christmas trees include the Norway Spruce, Korean Fir, Balsam Fir, Frasier Fir and the Colorado Blue Spruce. They may not be as attractive as an artificial or once-living tree but since it is a potted Christmas tree, you can roll it outside to your porch or patio after the holiday and water it until you use it again the next year. It’s Jubbling 101. Ten years ago, I decided to give it a shot and I purchased a potted tree that ended up in my yard after Christmas. Then in 2004, I decided to do it again only this time I put the tree in a pot and put it outside after Christmas. We have nothing on the Charlie Brown Christmas tree but a little Jubbling and my original $65 investment has carried forward for the last 4 Christmases.

Caring for a Potted Christmas Tree – Limiting the amount of time your potted Christmas tree spends in your house is the best way to make sure it survives the holiday. According to Jenni at Bainbridge Gardens, the best way to care for a potted Christmas tree is:

Before the living Christmas tree goes into the house, give it some transitional time in an unheated garage or outbuilding. If it will be indoors for 5-6 days, it should be in a transitional area for a similar length of time. Check the plant daily and water as needed to keep the soil moist but not soggy. We recommend placing the tree in a room that’s between 60 and 65 degrees if possible and definitely not near a heat register.

Our potted Christmas tree will spend 2 weeks in the house but you’re better off following Jenni’s guidelines. Contact your local nursery and see what they have available. A potted Christmas tree may not look perfect but it will more than serve its purpose and that is to hold ornaments, lights and allow you to put presents underneath it.

My kids still pull the “dad’s cheap” card on me but in the end, I think they know it’s Jubbling. And given the option of switching our holiday from celebrating Christmas to Festivus, my kids appreciate the potted Christmas tree a little more. The last thing they want to experience is Festivus and the traditional raising of the aluminum pole.

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Reusable Shopping Bags Come In Leaded And Unleaded Varieties

Just when we started to feel good about ourselves and regularly use our reusable shopping bags, a story comes out that they may be dangerous due to the toxic levels of lead they contain. It’s not the bags themselves but the leaded paint in the decals put on the bags. Yellow and green are the common leaded culprits. According to The Tampa Tribune, lead was found in bags purchased at Winn-Dixie, Publix, Sweetbay, Walmart and Target. In specific bags from Winn-Dixie and Publix, lead was found at levels above 100 ppm. This is below current EPA standards but will exceed safe levels for children in August 2011.

Some retailers are offering free exchanges or returns – check with the place you purchased your bags from to find out how they are handling the issue. For the most part, consumers seem to care less about their possibly toxic bags. As Elnora Cooper said to the Associated Press with her reusable shopping bag under her arm, “I’m not eating the bag … and I’m not going to get rid of it.”


I’m beginning to think that GroceryShirt 2.0 will have to wait.

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Instructables.com – Online Resource For The Resourceful

Instructables.com is one of those websites that you can make your homepage; Macgyver definitely would. It’s loaded with interesting DIY ideas and fundamental to the site is the whole reuse thing; turn nothing into something or extend the life of the stuff you have around. Treehugger.com posted an article about Instructables.com’s Alchemy Goods Inner Tube Reuse Contest. It’s being judged right now but we’ve already picked our winner [above].

Check out their site and see what contests are open and submit an idea. Or like me, just browse around and see what smarter people are doing with stuff most people would throw out.

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Potted “Living” Christmas Trees

Charlie Brown Christmas TreeWhen it comes to buying a Christmas tree, the decision for most is to choose between artificial or a barely dead tree. If you go artificial, you can get perfection every year and spend the holidays convincing everyone how close your artificial tree looks to an actual one. If you go to the Christmas tree lot and get a recently-departed tree, you can choose from a hundred or so trees and find the right height and fullness. You can even get it flocked on the spot if that’s your preference. Now Jubbling wants to recommend an alternative – the potted “living” Christmas tree.

A potted Christmas tree is exactly what the name suggests – take a trip to your local nursery and pick out a potted tree to use as your Christmas tree. Jubbling Christmas Tree According to our local nursery, Bainbridge Gardens, robust and durable types of living Christmas trees include the Norway Spruce, Korean Fir, Balsam Fir, Frasier Fir and the Colorado Blue Spruce. They may not be as attractive as an artificial or once-living tree but since it is a potted Christmas tree, you can roll it outside to your porch or patio after the holiday and water it until you use it again the next year. It’s Jubbling 101. Ten years ago, I decided to give it a shot and I purchased a potted tree that ended up in my yard after Christmas. Then in 2004, I decided to do it again only this time I put the tree in a pot and put it outside after Christmas. We have nothing on the Charlie Brown Christmas tree but a little Jubbling and my original $65 investment has carried forward for the last 4 Christmases.

Caring for a Potted Christmas Tree – Limiting the amount of time your potted Christmas tree spends in your house is the best way to make sure it survives the holiday. According to Jenni at Bainbridge Gardens, the best way to care for a potted Christmas tree is:

Before the living Christmas tree goes into the house, give it some transitional time in an unheated garage or outbuilding. If it will be indoors for 5-6 days, it should be in a transitional area for a similar length of time. Check the plant daily and water as needed to keep the soil moist but not soggy. We recommend placing the tree in a room that’s between 60 and 65 degrees if possible and definitely not near a heat register.

Our potted Christmas tree will spend 2 weeks in the house but you’re better off following Jenni’s guidelines. Contact your local nursery and see what they have available. A potted Christmas tree may not look perfect but it will more than serve its purpose and that is to hold ornaments, lights and allow you to put presents underneath it.

My kids still pull the “dad’s cheap” card on me but in the end, I think they know it’s Jubbling. And given the option of switching our holiday from celebrating Christmas to Festivus, my kids appreciate the potted Christmas tree a little more. The last thing they want to experience is Festivus and the traditional raising of the aluminum pole.

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TOMS Shoes – There is a Jubbling Gosh!

So many copy and so few truly innovate. Blake Mycoskie is a true Jubbling pioneer and came up with the idea of TOMS Shoes while traveling in Argentina in 2006 and noticing how many kids ran around barefoot. The dilemma was that in rural parts of Argentina, you had to wear shoes to attend school so some kids were not only barefoot but they were uneducated too. Blake returned to the US, sold his business and started TOMS Shoes with the idea that if you buy one pair of TOMS Shoes, they’ll donate another pair to a kid in a developing country. The shoes have either rubber or rope soles and are modeled after the Alpargata shoes worn by Argentine farmers. In addition to rope soles, TOMS Shoes are also made from renewable materials including canvas and cotton.

The best way to order TOMS shoes is online through TOMSShoes.com.  TOMS Shoes are in the $50 range and at this point with Jubbling, I’m not sure if we’re going to buy first or receive. I see my kids running around barefoot and I’m afraid Blake Mycoskie and his crew might show up at my house with shoes for my kids before I can become a customer. I hope they don’t put the video on their website.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kt3BQQ6dQaQ[/youtube]

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You should get a stroke for using Dixon Golf balls.

Dixon Golf BallsAre your balls in the rough? Are you not Jubbling when you swing your stick? It is easy to notice that the game of golf is not exactly earth friendly, why with all those gas-powered golf carts and showering sprinkler heads. Well, let’s clarify a bit, shall we?

One company, Dixon Golf, has now made losing golf balls in the rough, or even finding the lost balls of others to be. Dixon Golf offers the Earth Ball, a moderately priced ball that can be recycled after use. Heck, they’ll even give you a $1 towards new Dixon balls when you recycle their own and $.50 when you recycle another brand. That’s Jubbling folks! Here’s what they offer (directly from their website):

  • High-performance
  • Made from renewable materials
  • 100% recyclable with a recycling program to back it up
  • Does not contain heavy metal pollutants like cobalt, tungsten, or lead
  • 100% recycled packaging

Read their reviews. Many said the Dixon Earth Ball is a better play than more expensive brands. That’s important if you’re going to lay down cash for a Jubbling product versus a tried and true performer but it’s exactly the kind of thinking that will change the game.

Dixon also touts themselves as responsible corporate neighbors. They report that communications are mostly emailed instead of paper mailings and that 25 percent of their employees use carpooling or public transportation in order to lessen overall emissions.  And check this out – 10% of all their profits are used for philanthropic advances. Think of that as multi-level Jubbling!

Of course, some things will never change: I’ll continue to shank more balls than I hit for par but at least now, when I lose a ball, I can smile with pride at my Jubbling.

Dixon Golf – Toll free 866-468-2259 http://www.dixongolf.com

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