Clotheslines Season Is Around The Corner. Check Out The Clotheslines Of 1930’s New York.

Clotheslines on laundry day in 1930's New YorkBuzzfeed posted “Monday, Laundry Day, New York City” and it was a nice reminder that clothesline season is almost here. My indoor clothesline has been working overtime this winter. I wash and hang a load on plastic coat hangers in the morning and then repeat the wash and hang process one more time in the evening.

Clotheslines on laundry day in 1930's New York

If you’re chomping at the bit and can’t wait for clothesline season, hang-dry your clothes indoors by purchasing an adjustable closet rod and a pair of wall brackets to hang your laundry over your washer/dryer. Your bathroom shower rod will work too.

Clotheslines on laundry day in 1930's New York

If you’re an anxious planner and can’t wait to get your outdoor clothesline set up, you can invest in an outdoor umbrella clothesline or get real old school and tie a rope/phone cord between to posts/trees.

Clotheslines on laundry day in 1930's New York

From my experience, wooden clothespins work the best on outdoor clothesline. Plastic clothespins become brittle from the temperature change of daytime heat and cool evenings.

Clotheslines on laundry day in 1930's New York

Good luck with clothesline season. Remember: clotheslines are the easy-to-install, affordable solar panel system. [Buzzfeed]

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Even Procter & Gamble Wants You To Wash Your Clothes In Cold Water

Washing Clothes With Cold Water Is Good (And That's About It)My bad here – I’ve spent so much of my Jubbling focused on the dryer-free clothesline phase of doing laundry that I lost sight of the washing side. The NY Times is even jumping into this with their article Cold-Water Detergents Get a Cold Shoulder about how 3/4 of the energy used to wash our clothes comes from heating the water and how energy saving cold water detergents will get your clothes just as clean their hot water equivalents. According to the story, Procter & Gamble estimates that only 38% of global detergent use is with the cold water variety and they’d like to see that number improve to 70%.

Why do people still insist on using hot/warm water to wash their clothes? It couldn’t be a germ – bacteria – virus thing because the washer water never gets hot enough to kill any of these. More than likely it’s about habit and like other bad habits, now is a good time to give it a break.

Related article: Debunking The Hot Water Laundry Myth – Why Are Consumers So Superstitious & Stubborn?

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Clotheslines – Support System For The Affordable Solar Panel

Clothesline SeasonFor all of the enviro-babble, green-washings and Copenhagen’s, Jubbling believes the best way to reduce our impact on the environment is by thinking small and a great place to start is with clotheslines. That’s right, clotheslines – a rope tied between 2 trees or a rope spanning your balcony – the clothesline is making a comeback and these solar panel supports are affordable and effective. Our clothesline is made out of an old phone extension cord and by using it from May through Sept 2009, we were able to drop our power consumption by over 10%; the period when electrical rates are at their highest. And should your neighbors complain, show them the thong you didn’t hang up on the clothesline and I think they’ll reconsider.

Give it a try and time it to cover a billing cycle with your electric company. I think you’ll like the results. And remember, we’re not asking you to do anything extreme like washing your clothes in a river. It’s just a clothesline and the past stigma associated with hanging your clothes outside will be replaced with the pride you feel at your lower energy bills and the adoration you receive from your neighbors.

Some sites to check out include: ClothelinesSource.com or Urban Clotheslines.

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