Power Saving Tips When Your Out Of Town For The Holidays

Circuit Breaker BoxStandby power can best be described as the power our electronics consume when they’re turned off. According to Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, standby power accounts for 10-15% of the electricity we consume. So here are a few tips that may help you consume less juice while you’re out of town for the holidays:

  • Turn off every light.
  • Unplug everything you can. TV’s, clock radios, power strips, computers, DVR, microwave etc. A good way to decide is to unplug everything with a digital clock or remote.
  • Thermostat. If you can, turn it off or put it at a setting where it will barely be used. We turned our thermostats off while we were out of town over Thanksgiving. When we got home, our house was colder inside than it was outside.
  • Turn off your water heater? I actually psyched myself out of doing this and I’m glad I didn’t. As it turned out, our water was the only thing hot in our house when we got home. I would turn it off during a summer trip.

These are just suggestions that’ll hopefully help lower your power bill. Prior to Jubbling, I wouldn’t think twice about powering down and my only concern was making sure the doors were locked and my Speedo was packed.

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Toshiba’s Regza 32BE3 32-inch LED Backlit Television Uses ZERO Power In Standby Mode

Toshiba Regza 32BE3 LED TelevisionElectronics are notorious sippers of electricity even when you think they’re turned off. It’s called vampire draw or standby power and it accounts for 5-10% of the electricity we consume. Toshiba’s Regza 32BE3 32″ LED television is different and thanks to its Eco Chip, completely powers down when you turn it off; no need to unplug it (if you’re freakish like that). And when it’s on, the LED backlit Regza 32BE3 draws 27% less power than Toshiba’s previous 32″ model and includes settings to reduce the screen’s brightness to 50 – 75% based on the lighting levels in your room.

So if you are in the market for a new TV and power consumption is an important factor, be sure to check out the Toshiba Regza 32BE3 32″ LED TV. It’s due out in mid-December. And if you don’t own a TV and look down on everyone that does, good for you too. You get a star. [Wired.com]

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Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Wants To Help You Reduce Standby Power and Vampire Draw

Lawrence Berkeley National Labs Standby Power and Vampire Draw DataLawrence Berkeley National Laboratories resource for calculating standby power and vampire draw is not new but the information never gets old. Standby power is the power consumed by an appliance when it is turned off and vampire draw refers to charged devices, like cellphones, that continue to consume electricity when fully charged. It’s amazing how much energy is consumed by all of the devices in our homes that are not in use. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory offers clues to easily identify those items:

  • Includes remote control
  • Has external power supply
  • Digital display, LED status light, or digital clock
  • Contains a battery charger
  • Has soft-touch key-pad

According to LBNL’s FAQ, standby power and vampire draw accounts for 5 – 10% of the electricity we consume. They also point out that with some changes, this could be reduced by 75% .

I’d swear the set-top box DVR for cable tv and satellite was developed by electric companies; it’s the only device I found in the list that consumes nearly as much electricity OFF as it does ON. One of the easy solutions suggested for reducing standby power and vampire draw is the use of power strips because they allow you to disconnect multiple devices at one time.

You probably do not have to get all freakish about reducing standby power and vampire draw; that would be my tendency. So we will re-post this article every 6 months and hopefully each time, you’ll find one area that you can make a change and reduce your consumption.

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Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Wants To Help You Reduce Standby Power and Vampire Draw

Lawrence Berkeley National Labs Standby Power and Vampire Draw DataLawrence Berkeley National Laboratories resource for calculating standby power and vampire draw is not new but the information never gets old. Standby power is the power consumed by an appliance when it is turned off and vampire draw refers to charged devices, like cellphones, that continue to consume electricity when fully charged. It’s amazing how much energy is consumed by all of the devices in our homes that are not in use. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory offers clues to easily identify those items:

  • Includes remote control
  • Has external power supply
  • Digital display, LED status light, or digital clock
  • Contains a battery charger
  • Has soft-touch key-pad

According to LBNL’s FAQ, standby power and vampire draw accounts for 5 – 10% of the electricity we consume. They also point out that with some changes, this could be reduced by 75% .

I’d swear the set-top box DVR for cable tv and satellite was developed by electric companies; it’s the only device I found in the list that consumes nearly as much electricity OFF as it does ON. One of the easy solutions suggested for reducing standby power and vampire draw is the use of power strips because they allow you to disconnect multiple devices at one time.

You probably do not have to get all freakish about reducing standby power and vampire draw; that would be my tendency. So we will re-post this article every 6 months and hopefully each time, you’ll find one area that you can make a change and reduce your consumption.

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Double Shot Of Jubbling: Solar Costs Fall in 2010 And More Wind Power Options

Rooftop Solar Panels and Xzeres Wind Turvine
For all of the outlying ideas for generating electricity, we keep coming back to solar and wind power based solutions and now they’re looking even more attractive. It’s all thanks to the economies of scale and these old school technologies are only going to get more affordable, efficient and creatively packaged.

Cost Of Solar Falls Again In 2010 – A study out of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory finds that the cost per kilowatt of solar has fallen again in 2010 thanks to improved manufacturing and product efficiency. California and New Jersey, which account for 87% of all solar installations, saw the largest gains as the price for solar dropped by 14 and 16% respectively. In 1998, the price per kilowatt for solar panels was $10.80 and in the first 10 months of 2010, the price per kilowatt has dropped to $6. Leasing options from companies like SolarCity and Sungevity have also made it more attractive for people looking to move toward solar. Gone are the days when installing solar meant you had to take out a second mortgage and shell out $25-40,000. CNET

Wind Turbine For Your Home? – If you’ve ever driven through Palm Desert CA, you probably have seen the huge collection of massive wind turbines. It’s unreal and distracting because it looks like a scene out of a Godzilla movie. A company out of Oregon wants to change our impression of wind power by manufacturing and maintaining more affordable and possibly residential friendly wind turbines. The company is Xzeres and their wind towers stand 60-100 feet with a rotor that is 24 feet in diameter. The size of Xzeres’s towers are in contrast to the 300 ft tall, 250 ft diameter wind turbines we’re used to seeing. Xzeres latest offering is similar to “lease to own” options found in the solar industry – they’ll install their wind turbine, you pay Xzeres’s for your electricity as if they were your utility company and then you own the turbine in 8 – 10 years. It’s a lease to own where the byproduct is electricity you would’ve paid for anyway. Now, if they could only make them look like pine trees….NY Times

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