When The Power Goes Out, Briefcase-Sized Sugoi Battery From Japan Can Keep The Fridge Going.

Sugoi Battery Portable Power BackupWho wouldn’t want a Sugoi Battery? The 5.5 lbs Sugoi Battery is a 75,000 mAh portable backup lithium battery ($467) that can keep your refrigerator going for up to 7.8 hours (smaller Japanese fridge?). Sugoi Battery is also working on an adapter so you can use it to charge up to 16 mobile devices at one time. In addition to the lithium battery version, Sugoi Battery has a more affordable ($121) old-school lead acid version that holds 12,900mAh of power.

The Sugoi Battery has 5 power outputs (including 2 USB) and can be recharged via standard power outlet, solar or through your car’s lighter port. Not sure if the Sugoi Battery is available in the US but if works to its translated specs, it would definitely have a market in homes where using a diesel/gas generator is not an option… and even in homes where a generator is an option. [RocketNews24]

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Throw Out Your TV? Charging Your iPhone 5 Only Costs $0.41/Year. Samsung’s Galaxy S3 Only $0.53.

Smart phone power consumption comparison chart. Opower.comWe’ve all heard about the Apple/Samsung legal battle but Jubbling now just wants both sides to shake hands, maybe hug it out a little, and work together and encourage users to watch TV/movies on their respective mobile devices. That’s because in comparison, the iPhone 5 ($0.41/year) and Galaxy S3 ($0.53/year) will sip on as little power in a year as a 50″ plasma may consume in a day!

Opower analyzed the power consumption of both the iPhone 5 and Galaxy S3 and compared their results to common consumer electronics found in a home. Obviously, groups of 3 or more people will not crowd around a mobile device to watch television; in that situation, see if an iPad ($1.38/year) will work. But if you’re alone and watching Lost on Netflix Instant, turn off the big TV and watch it on your iPhone/Galaxy S3. [CNET and Opower]

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FutureDash’s EnergyBuddy Home Energy Monitoring System

EnergyBuddy Home Energy Monitoring SystemFor a limited time at $99, the EnergyBuddy starter kit home energy monitoring system is a reasonably priced way to track the power you consume in your home. FutureDash’s EnergyBuddy is simple to set-up and includes current clamps and a wireless transmitter that attaches and resides at your Zigbee compatible smart-meter. Once connected, the EnergyBuddy’s color changes between red/yellow/green depending on your power consumption goals set through the app. The $99 package doesn’t include the SmartPlugs that allows the user to remotely turn on/off connected appliances via smartphone/app – they’re $50 additional.

You can pre-order the EnergyBuddy through the crowd-source fundraising site Indiegogo. The $99 EnergyBuddy starter kit price reflects a 40% discount off of its eventual retail price of $179 and is good for the first 75 Indiegogo orders. Their goal is to raise $60,000 by August 19, 2012.


EnergyBuddy Home Energy Monitoring System
Yeah, we weren’t too high on the other $99 power conserving product – Insteon SmartLinc Hub. That’s because it only controls their $29 LED light bulb and doesn’t track home energy use. Out of the box, the $99 EnergyBuddy will do more by allowing users to monitor their entire household and the simplistic changing colored-lights will also encourage kids to be involved in reducing power consumption. And oh, the video is awesome too. [Electronic House]

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nPower PEG: A Shake Weight That Can Charge Mobile Devices

Fremont Electric's nPower PegTremont Electric’s nPower® PEG is a kinetic energy, USB charging device was originally released in 2010 and charges its built-in battery through an up/down motion against gravity. The latest 2012 model weighs in at 14 oz. and is sleeker, incorporates a carrying hoop and has doubled its lithium polymer battery capacity to 2000mAh – enough to charge an iPhone 4 up to 75%. The nPower® PEG is designed for bikers, hikers and runners who can generate a little possibly-needed juice when they venture out of the house.

The price of the nPower® PEG is a little steep at $169. But compared to solar backpacks (around $200) that need to charge in direct sunlight, the nPower® PEG has an advantage of being able to re-charge in any condition or season. Check out the complete FAQ on their site for more information on the nPower® PEG. [nPower® PEG]

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