LEGO Shoes And Shoes For Life – Lower Your Footprint With LYF Shoes.

LYF Shoes - Pinstripe StyleLYF Shoes must know something about how much people love LEGOs because they’re using the same building-block principles to change the way we buy, repair and wear our shoes. Here’s more about LYF Shoes:

“Individual components are made from single-source sustainable materials and are assembled in 90 seconds to meet a customer’s request. This bypasses those monolithic shoe assembly factories which use toxic glues and ship boxes of air halfway around the world. Our technology allows us to pursue many more fashion, fit and ecological advances than the big brands can – while still being competitive with them on price.

We’ve also unlocked unlimited creative expression using digital integration tools, and created the first LYF Cyclable shoe.”

LYF Shoes are currently on fundraising site Kickstarter.

[LYF Shoes via TechCrunch]

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Now On Sale At Best Buy – Useless Plastic Box 1.2

Useless plastic box 1.2 for sale at Best Buy.

The “Useless Plastic Box 1.2” from Plastic Jesus is just “another gadget you don’t really need, will not work once you get it home, will be replaced by a new model in 4 weeks and has a battery life too short to be of use.” Hilarious! [Laughing Squid]

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Satechi Touch USB LED Lamp: Turn Any Empty Bottle Into A Lamp.

The Satechi Touch USB-powered LED lamp lets the reuser change their lamp to match their mood and/or incorporate the empties they have lying around. Not only does the $25 Satechi Touch make a great gift but it’s also a nice way to reassign your recyclables. [Gizmodo]


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Brick And Mortar 2.0: Austrailian Retail Store Charges $5 To Look. Deducts It From What You Buy.

Just looking fee sign in Celiac Supplies' storefront window.Online shopping has a new enemy and it’s not an internet sales tax. The window sign above was created by the owner of Celiac Supplies, Georgina, and it’s in response to the “showrooming” and the “just looking” shoppers that visit her store and purchase from her competitors. From Georgina [Adelaide Now]:

“I’ve had a gut full of working and not getting paid. I can tell straight away who are the rat bags who are going to come in here and pick my brain and disappear.”

I get her frustration but it sounds like a little people repellant might be chasing the customers away too.

Moving to retail vs online: is showrooming and purchasing online more Jubbling? Can ‘sort of’ be our answer? [Adelaide Now via Laughing Squid]


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‘A Brief History of the 5-cent Bag Tax’ Video.

A Brief History of the 5-cent Bag Tax “A Brief History of the 5-cent Bag Tax” video was created by DC based sketch comedy group Dunk Your Bagel for American University’s Eco-Comedy Video Competition. It’s a must see for any city government considering a plastic grocery bag fee. It turns out that gut punches, rat eating and being sprayed in the eyes with Windex won’t deter people from asking for a plastic grocery bag the way a $.05 fee will. [Planetizen]


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UK’s Horsemeat Scandal Changes 6 in 10 Shopper’s Buying Habits. 30% Buy Less Processed Meats.

Which? Graphic:  6 in 10 changed their shopping habits because of the horsemeat scandal.A poll was conducted by Which? to gauge consumer confidence in the food industry in the wake of the UK’s horsemeat scandal. Here’s a summary of the poll results (from Which?):

“Consumer trust in the food industry has dropped by a quarter (24%) since the horsemeat scandal broke, a Which? survey has revealed. 30% of shoppers are now buying less processed meat and a quarter (24%) are buying fewer ready meals with meat in, or choosing vegetarian options.

Two thirds of people (68%) don’t think the government has been giving enough attention to enforcing labelling laws, with half of consumers (47%) not confident that ingredient information is accurate.

Confidence in food safety has also taken a hit. Before the scandal broke, nine in 10 felt confident when buying products in the supermarket. This has dropped to seven in 10.”

According to the Guardian, the horsemeat scandal has been a boon for meatless-meat producer Quorn:

“As sales of frozen burgers have tumbled amid further evidence of horsemeat in a range of meat products including ready meals, Quorn – the UK’s biggest vegetarian ready meal brand – said last week that it had seen sales growth more than double in the second half of February as shoppers snapped up its burgers, mince and sausages made from a form of fungus.”

I’m sure this change in consumer buying habits to non-meat meat products is the reaction most people expected.

On the plus side, other than some people gagging and a few hurling at the thought, there haven’t been any reports of people becoming ill by eating horsemeat. Another bonus of the horsemeat scandal: it’s kind of nice to hear that consumers are working down the food chain – hopefully most will stay there. [Guardian and Which?]

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