Backhoes Buried In A Building’s Foundation Because It’s Cheaper.

Buried backhoe.

From the ‘If you can afford it, you can consume it’ file comes the story of how construction equipment is being buried in a building’s foundation because it’s cheaper than getting a crane to lift it out.

From Gizmodo:

“So these diggers team up, usually two-per-property, and carve out a little slice of heaven underfoot, sometimes up to 75 feet into the earth (where else are you supposed to store your fleet of vintage Ferraris, eh?).

Then what? Well, these super heavy mechanical shovels are basically stuck. Cranes can be used to lift them out but that’s expensive and generally a logistical nightmare. It’s cheaper and easier to essentially do nothing, so these machines being given a burial of sand and gravel right there where they’ve finished their work.”

Sweet! You can read more about this in the New Statesman.

So the classic children’s book “Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel” was a Jubbling exception. With no need for an earth mover in the basement of these buildings, burying the hardware is the only illogical solution. Hopefully they let thieves part it out first. [G]


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Luna Ring – Installing Solar Panels On The Moon And Beaming Generated Electricity To Earth. [Video]

Solar panels on the moon beaming electricity to Earth.

It’s called the Luna Ring and it’s one of Shimizu Corporation’s sustainable ideas for powering future Earth. It’s not a new idea but the Luna Rings video is making the rounds again. Here are some tech specs on the Luna Ring:

“The Shimizu Corporation proposes creating a ‘Luna Ring’ using materials derived from lunar soil along its 11,000-km (6,800-mile) equator. The plan involves starting with an array that’s a few kilometers wide and eventually increasing that to around 400 km (250 miles).

The goal is to generate a continuous stream of power from the side of the Moon that’s always facing the Sun, and beam it down to Earth from the side that’s in shadow. It’s an ambitious idea that calls for assembling machinery transported from Earth and using tele-operated robots to do the actual construction on the Moon’s surface, once it arrives.

The multi-phase project, to be spread out over a period of 30 years, envisions creating construction materials using a combination of strategies. Water, the firm claims, could be produced by reducing lunar soil with hydrogen imported from Earth. The company also proposes making lunar concrete by extracting cementing material, and utilizing solar-heat treatment processes to create bricks, ceramics, and glass fibers. The concept also calls for remotely-controlled robots to undertake tasks such as excavating the surroundings, leveling the ground and laying out solar panel-studded concrete. Embedded cables could transfer the collected solar energy and send it to transmission stations.

Power could be beamed to the Earth through microwave power transmission antennas, about 20 m (65 ft) in diameter, and high density lasers, both guided by radio beacons. Microwave power receiving rectennas on Earth, located offshore or in areas with little cloud cover, could convert the received microwave power into DC electricity.”

So besides everything, what could go wrong with Luna Ring? This makes my idea to dam the mouth of Puget Sound, drain it, so I can catch all of the salmon seem sane. I think I’ll put my idea on a 30 year plan. [Gizmag]

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Tiny Home 2.0: Bicycle Edition.

Tiny Home 2.0: Bicycle Edition.Mobile tiny home bicycle is hard to not like. From Reddit user Wood-angel, the bicycle transported tiny home has a tiny kitchen, tiny TV and a tiny sleeping area. Want to build your own mobile tiny home? Blueprint below. [HuffPo and Reddit]


Bicycle tiny home blueprints.


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Post Hurricane Sandy Real Estate Deals: ‘The Great Sandy Sell-Off’ Video.

“If the storm was just isolated to Rockaway, I would understand the fear. But this wasn’t isolated to Rockaway – this happened throughout all 5 boroughs [of New York] and I think that’s why people feel this isn’t going to happen again. This was the perfect storm.”
Lisa Jackson, Rockaway Properties

Yes, the damaged homes of Rockaway are selling at a discount but what do you do when the ‘Perfect Storm’ becomes an annual event? Deal or not, I can’t understand why home buyers would actively seek out homes that not only suffered significant damage but are still in harm’s way. Oh wait, I found an old Far Side comic that explains it:

Far Side - School for the gifted.

[Climate Desk via Guardian]

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Stadium Lofts: Repurposing Indianapolis’s Art Deco Bush Baseball Stadium Into 134 Residences.

Stadium Lofts - Bush Stadium Indianapolis.Jubbling loves the Stadium Lofts project. Adaptively designed by Heartland Design, the Stadium Loft complex is turning Indianapolis’s old Bush Stadium into 134 residences.

Bush Stadium was built in 1931 but hasn’t seen any baseball action since 1996. More recently, the art deco stadium was used as a parking lot for Cash for Clunker cars. Now, as part of Develop Indy redevelopment project, the normally demolished stadium is being turned into housing. From The Architect’s Newspaper:

“Bush Stadium’s stone art deco entrance and flanking brick walls have been incorporated into the new building, and the stadium’s steel canopy forms the roof. The existing structure has been shored up and windows added to the brick walls.”

Other features include creating common areas out of the original ticket booths and the baseball field (with concrete replacing base paths) will remain as an open green space for residents.

The Stadium Lofts will have easy access to pedestrian paths and trails and convenient access to shopping, restaurants and downtown. What’s not to like? [The Architect’s Newspaper]



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Corrosive Concrete Halts Construction Of Second Tallest Building In The World.

Ping'an International Finance Center
Ping'an International Finance CenterIt’s probably too late to reconsider constructing the 660m, 116-story Ping’an International Finance Center so hopefully they can get it right. What’s halting construction? It turns out that several contractors supplying concrete to the project may have been using unprocessed sea sand in their mix which over time, could compromise the stability of the future 2nd tallest building in the world and the tallest building in China. From Dezeen:

“While cheap sea sand offers cost-saving opportunities for contractors, the salt and chloride present in it can corrode steel reinforcements over time and ultimately cause a building to collapse.”

With the delays and the possible added cost of removing and replacing all of the skunk-concrete, maybe the developers will stop at 58 stories and cut their losses. The Ping’an International Finance Center was only going to be the second tallest skyscraper in the world anyways. [Dezeen via Inhabitat]

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