Home Built From Junkyard Car Parts And Poplar Tree Bark.

[youtube width=”425″ height=”239″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EwE1XkDWIUY[/youtube]
Thanks again Faircompanies.com for posting another Macgyver inspired video. This one is about a couple in Berkeley that built a house out of old cart parts and furniture factory waste tree bark. The builders/designers, Karl Wanaselja and Cate Leger, spent months searching their local junkyards for the right parts including the side windows of Dodge Caravans which became the awnings for their home. Car roof sections and Poplar tree bark was used as siding in this shining example of junkyard Jubbling.

Cate Leger and Karl Wanaselja designed their home in their backyard office that was built out of an old shipping container. Their goal was to use precycled material before it went through the energy intensive recycling process of getting melted down.

Watching the video of their completed house reminded me of a local home [pictured below] that had Cate and Karl duplicated, might’ve saved them quite a bit of time.

Boat House Washington

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“Let Them Eat Cake”…While I Watch A Movie In My Mercedes SUV Parked In My 10th Floor Heated Garage

200 Eleventh Avenue Condo with ParkingIf you’re trying to find that fine line between excess and sustainable, this story makes it much easier. The condominiums at 200 Eleventh Avenue were designed to give that suburban feel to their owners by allowing them to park their vehicles just steps away from their upper floor units. Basically, drive your car into a jumbo sized elevator and when you hit your floor, drive off and park it in the heated 300 sq. ft. garage next to your condo. It’s estimated that the parking space with a Manhattan view alone would cost $800,000.

Jubbling could run wild with this story but we’ve opted not to. The story and the unsustainable idea that “if you can afford it, you can consume it” speaks for itself. [Treehugger and NYTimes]

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Axion International Makes Railroad Ties, Bridges and Pilings Out Of Recycled Hard Plastic Containers

Axion International STRUXURE - River Tweed Bridge Pebbleshire Scotland
Axion Composite Railroad TiesBrilliant idea – recycle old plastic containers to make products that we don’t have direct contact with like bridges, railroad ties and pier pilings. That’s what Axion International is doing and their 100% recycled component products are finding a home all over the world. Their STRUXURE™ Composite Infrastructure Products and ECOTRAX Composite Railroad Ties resist insects and marine parasites and do not rust, splinter, rot or leach toxic chemicals. Initial costs for Axion products are higher than industry standard non-recycled building materials but are more price competitive over their low-maintenance lifetime. [NYTimes]

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One Day, We Hope Everything Will Be Covered With Solar Panels Like The Blackfriars Bridge

Blackfriars Bridge Solar Panels - Solar CenturyThe Blackfriars Bridge in London is getting a makeover and part of that process is covering it with 6,000 sq. meters of photovoltaic panels from Solar Century. When it’s completed in 2012, the Blackfriars Bridge will be the largest solar array in London and the largest solar covered bridge in the world. The PV panels will provide 1/2 of the power needed to run the new Blackfriars railway station.

Solar panels are already being designed as roofing tiles, embedded in windows and replacing the normal aluminum covering used on parking structures. Applying solar as shade or covering could be the norm and projects like the Blackfriars Bridge is just another example. Here’s one more…

[youtube width=”325″ height=”244″]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eot2kNt6rY[/youtube]Dog with solar panel: Dog gets a walk, owner charges cellphone. Recombu

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