The New York Times vs Tesla Motors For Dummies.

Tesla Model S in snowHere’s our version of the New York Times vs Tesla Motors saga for dummies by a dummy.

  1. Feb 8: New York Times columnist John Broder wrote an article about his unfavorable experience driving the Tesla Model S EV along the Tesla Supercharger network: “Stalled Out on Tesla’s Electric Highway”

  2. Feb 11: Elon Musk tweets about Mr. Broder’s article and calls it a “fake”:

    Elon Musk then follows it up with this tweet:


  3. Feb 12: Mr. Broder writes a response to Mr. Musk’s tweets in The New York Times article “The Charges Are Flying Over a Test of Tesla’s Charging Network”

  4. Feb 13: Elon Musk posts “A Most Peculiar Test Drive” on Tesla’s blog and using the data extracted from John Broder’s review Model S, counter the claims he made in the original article. Among other issues, the data shows that Mr. Broder did not fully charge his Model S, drove in circles, cranked the heat and often exceeded the recommended cruising speed of 55 mph.

  5. Feb 14: John Broder responds to Elon Musk’s post by tweeting:

We’ll see what happens next between these two but one good thing that did come out of the NY Times/Tesla battle is that I finally figured out how to embed tweets into my posts. I’m now up to 2011!


Update: Feb 14 4:41 pm PST: John Broder has responded to Elon Musk and Tesla and it looks like this story is becoming a he said / she said matter. Counseling may be next. Happy Valentine’s Day!

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Jubbling Loves Extreme Mountain Unicycling!

Extreme Mountain UnicyclingStephanie Dietze and Lutz Eichholz like to unicycle and they’ve taken they’re sport a step further by going extreme and unicycling down a 9000+ ft mountain. I personally wouldn’t try this with a full-face motorcycle helmet, carbon fiber bones and a sumo suit. So why does Jubbling love extreme mountain unicycling when we won’t participate in the sport and we can barely watch the video? It’s simple: they’re riding on one wheel instead of two (reduce!). [Core77]


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Lessons Learned From Eco-Cities In China.

Tianjin Eco-City Tianjin Eco-City - Solar panels in front of building.Wouldn’t it be great if we could have a do-over? China has been looking to redo by re-thinking their future cities and developing eco-cities like Tianjin Eco-city. When it’s complete some time after 2020, Tianjin Eco-city will be home to 350,000 residents where 90% of in-city travel can be accomplished by foot, bike or public transportation. Green buildings will be the norm and renewable power will supply 15% of the eco-city’s electricity needs. What’s the motivation? From the NY Times:

“Today, facing challenges like runaway urbanization, soaring energy consumption and environmental degradation, China is hoping to establish a different set of paragons. With its cities expected to swell by another 350 million residents in the next 25 years, according to World Bank estimates, the government is scurrying to find sustainable urban solutions. To that end, it hopes to have 100 model cities, 200 model counties, 1,000 model districts and 10,000 model towns by 2015.”

One interesting fact about the Tianjin Eco-city project is that when construction started in 2008, EV charging stations where never included in the plans. Maybe a good lesson that can be learned from China’s experience is to build future eco-cities that are simple and flexible. They didn’t plan for electric vehicles and now, just like every non eco-city, they have to update their infrastructure to account for them.

Check out the NYT article for more information on the goals and challenges of building an eco-city. [NY Times]

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Bicycle Barometer: Bike Or Ride Train To Work?

Bicycle Barometer by Richard J. PopeThe Bicycle Barometer by Richard J. Pope is doing more than just tracking the weather to determine the best way to get to work each day – it’s also receiving information about his local rail station (open/close, delayed) and the amount and type of precipitation. Mr. Pope made the Bicycle Barometer from an old clock he found at a flea market and he’s posted information on his site so DIY’ers in the UK can build their own. [OFTCC via Neatorama]


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Reusable Sports Helmet: Giro’s Combyn Is Constructed To Absorb Repeated Impacts.

Giro Combyn Sports HelmetUnplanned “one-impact” obsolescence no more! Giro’s Combyn snow-sports helmet is one of those “why didn’t somebody think of that sooner” ideas. Unlike most sports helmets that are only considered safe pre-impact, the snug fitting Giro Combyn has been designed to receive multiple impacts and always bounce back. How does it work? From Outside Online:

“The Combyn uses a patent-pending, impact-absorbing liner made with Vinyl Nitrile (VN) foam. The liner features two distinct layers of foam that allow the helmet to manage both high- and low-energy impacts across a wide range of temperatures. Unlike traditional expanded polystyrene (EPS) or expanded polypropylene (EPP) helmet liners, Vinyl Nitrile is soft and flexible. Layered with a proprietary shell material originally developed for football and hockey helmets, the result is a shell that delivers a comfortable and flexible fit with unmatched durability.”

The only way Giro could improve on their helmet technology is by expanding their lineup to a bicycle version. I’ve had the same bike helmet for 10+ years and it still uncomfortably works but it’s worn to the point that I’m basically wearing a styrofoam cooler on my head. Giro – please make a bicycle Combyn soon! [Gizmodo]


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Orp: Loud Dual-Tone Bike Horn And LED Light.

ORP - LED Light and Dual-Mode Bicycle HornOrp might be the perfect bike accessory. It’s a USB rechargeable, waterproof LED beacon light and dual-tone bicycle horn that should find a home with cyclist. Orp’s 87 lumens LED light works in three modes – slow strobe, fast strobe and constant on – and its integrated horn can go from an “on your left” 76 db to a “you in the car, wake up” 96 db.

Orp’s creators, Tory Orzeck and his team in Portland, are now looking for funding on Kickstarter. A $45 donation will get you an Orp that will eventually retail for $49.95. [Core77]


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