Peel-And-Stick Solar Cells Could Generate Renewable Power On Everything And Everyone.

Stanford University: Peel and Stick thin film solar cells.Researchers at Stanford University have developed a way to produce ultra-thin solar cells that can be peeled and applied to a variety of surfaces including cell phones, windows etc. From e360:

“Normally, thin-film solar cells are attached to rigid, often heavy, silicon and glass substrates because most unconventional surfaces aren’t compatible with the thermal and chemical processes involved in producing the cells. The new process gets around that challenge, the scientists say, because it does not require any fabrication to occur on the final substrate surface. Instead, it involves pressing an ultra-thin film of nickel, a silicon/silicon dioxide wafer, and a protective polymer into a “sandwich,” and then attaching a layer of thermal release tape. When dipped in room-temperature water, the thin-film solar cell can be peeled from the original wafer and attached to a wide range of surfaces, from window glass to cellphones.”

Depending on how the solar power is transferred and stored by the host, the applications of the Peel-and-Stick solar cell technology are endless.


Jubbling wants to help further this technology so we searched and discovered our possible, and now hair-less, candidate who’ll host a mobile solar farm:

Sticker Man:  Peel-And-Stick Mobile Solar Farm... Man
So where do you think the battery will go? [Yale e360]

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Climate Change Apathy: More Americans Believe Their Actions Will Not Slow Down Climate Change.

Yale Project on Climate Change Communication and George Mason University’s Center for Climate Change Communication

Click to enlarge

According to a survey conducted by the Yale Project on Climate Change Communication and George Mason University’s Center for Climate Change Communication, fewer Americans feel their individual actions will slow down climate change than they did 4 years ago. From the NY Times article:

“Sixty percent said energy-saving habits could help curb climate change if they were adopted by most Americans, down from 78 percent in 2008…”

The authors of the survey did find positives including the increased use of low-energy CFL light bulbs and more carpoolers and mass-transit riders. But this doesn’t take away from the key result of the survey that more Americans feel climate change is out of our control. What would reverse the downward trend and change people’s minds? Maybe telling them geoengineering is plan b. Consume less [NY Times]

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Fanny Adam’s ‘Story’ Sofa Replaces Bed, Desk, Dresser And Dining Table. Ms. Adam: I Think We Have A Playdate Opportunity.

Story Sofa from Fanny AdamMultipurpose furniture is the key to making tiny houses work. Designed for a college project by Fanny Adam, “Story” is a sofa prototype that can work as a bed, dresser, desk and dining table. It’s kind of a Swiss-Army couch that would be ideal for smaller living spaces.

Which brings me to the playdate idea. We need to set something up between college bound tiny house builder Austin Hay and design school student Fanny Adam. This is about as close to a Reese’s moment and you’ll ever get: one builds the tiny house and the other designs the transformable furniture for it. Somebody make this happen! [Gizmodo and faircompanies]

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Democratech’s Sprout Pencil Becomes A Plant Instead Of Trash.

When the Sprout pencil becomes an unusable nub, plant it in your garden instead of the garbage. That’s because it has a seed enclosed in its end-cap that when planted, can grow into an herb (the basil variety), flower or vegetable. Simple idea that with the help of their Kickstarter funds, Democratech will hopefully sell at a price close to standard pencils.

I first heard about the Sprout pencil back in August 2012. It seemed like a “gimmicky for good” idea and moved on. Then I watched the Kickstarter video and I have to make one recommendation: only plant the Sprout pencils in a pot. If you plant a dozen of these in a garden, pointed up, you are unintentionally creating a booby-trap similar to what you’d in see in a movie like Platoon or even Home Alone. No more barefoot walks in the garden.

And while I’m on the subject of pencils – has anyone noticed how low-quality they’ve become? Is it the wood or the lead/graphite? Maybe I should avoid the 20 for $1 deals from the office stores because after sharpening, I may end up with 10 usable pencils.

More than likely, the Sprout will sell at a premium over standard pencils so expectantly, they’ll be of higher quality. If they turn out to be inexpensive and low-quality, at least I’ll get 10 future plants immediately from my 20 pack. [Treehugger]

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Middle Tennessee State Creates $3000 Plug-In Hybrid Retrofit That’ll Work On Most Cars.

This reminds us of the Protean Drive™ System which would allow automakers to more easily manufacture and convert an existing car model into a hybrid vehicle. But the major difference with the system developed by Dr. Charles Perry and his team at Middle Tennessee State is that the plug-in hybrid functionality can be added to an existing vehicle. In their test, they used a 1994 Honda Accord station wagon. It’s a $3000 retrofit that could improve gas mileage by 50 – 100% and is aimed at “around town” drivers who only need to travel 35 miles or less. [Wired]

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No-Mix Vacuum Toilet Had Me At “Uses 90% Less Water.” The Other Features Sound Like Hot Gas.

No-Mix Vacuum Toilet   Nanyang Technical UniversityFor some reason, a good Jubblingified idea can get lost in a bunch of eco-crap. In this case, the crap is literal and the good idea is the No-Mix Vacuum Toilet. Developed by Assistant Professor Wang Jing-Yuan and 4 other researchers from Nanyang Technical University, the No-Mix Vacuum Toilet can process our dirty business with 90% less water by using airplane toilet like suction. It then separates the solids from the liquids and the captured goods are then processed further (from the Inhabitat article):

“The No-Mix Vacuum Toilet then diverts the liquid waste to a processing facility where components [are] used for fertilizers — nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium can be recovered. Meanwhile all solid waste is sent to a bioreactor where it will be digested to release bio-gas which contains methane. The gas can then be converted to electricity and used to fuel power plants or fuel cells.”

The ultimate aim of the No-Mix Vacuum Toilet team is to separate, capture and convert everything flushed into useful resources.No Mix Vacuum ToiletI’d buy a Vacuum Toilet and I do expect that my kids will try to drop a solid in the liquid section. Kids do that kind of stuff… so do adults. That’ll pass. What I don’t want to see is a toilet that uses 90% less water being delayed because we don’t have the infrastructure in place to process the poo and pee separately. It’s a great goal to have but it shouldn’t be all or none.

So please bring the No-Mix Vacuum Toilet to market asap so we can start conserving water. In the interim, we’ll just call it the No-Mix Vacuum Toilet. When we figure out how to separate #2 from #1, we can drop the strikethru and bring “No-Mix” back to the party. [Inhabitat]

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