Using A Beer Can To Jubblingly Boost The WiFi Signal In Your Home.

The Minute Hacks: How To Boost Your Wifi Signal is not a recent video or a new solution but we like that it’s only one minute long and reuses a beer can. Now, I just need my beer can to arrive. [Treehugger]

Large Old Style beer can.

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Stadium Lofts: Repurposing Indianapolis’s Art Deco Bush Baseball Stadium Into 134 Residences.

Stadium Lofts - Bush Stadium Indianapolis.Jubbling loves the Stadium Lofts project. Adaptively designed by Heartland Design, the Stadium Loft complex is turning Indianapolis’s old Bush Stadium into 134 residences.

Bush Stadium was built in 1931 but hasn’t seen any baseball action since 1996. More recently, the art deco stadium was used as a parking lot for Cash for Clunker cars. Now, as part of Develop Indy redevelopment project, the normally demolished stadium is being turned into housing. From The Architect’s Newspaper:

“Bush Stadium’s stone art deco entrance and flanking brick walls have been incorporated into the new building, and the stadium’s steel canopy forms the roof. The existing structure has been shored up and windows added to the brick walls.”

Other features include creating common areas out of the original ticket booths and the baseball field (with concrete replacing base paths) will remain as an open green space for residents.

The Stadium Lofts will have easy access to pedestrian paths and trails and convenient access to shopping, restaurants and downtown. What’s not to like? [The Architect’s Newspaper]



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Reduce: Offloading Three Tons Of Bamboo In 30 Seconds Without A Forklift.

Televisions, your next. [RocketNews 24]


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Andrew Ucles Enlists The Help Of Venomous Snakes To Catch Invasive Rabbits In Australia.

Andrew Ucles barehanded animal catchesThis is so Aus-some. Skipping the pindone poison treated carrots or oats, Andrew Ucles is going old-school to catch rabbits by chasing them into their holes and then siccing some venomous snakes on Australia’s invasive rodents. After watching the video below, it came to me that the most Jubbling way for the US to get rid of our invasive species (ie Asian carp, Burmese pythons etc.) is to import a bunch of shirtless Aussies to do the job. Just sayin. [Treehugger]


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Reduce, Recycle, Reuse, Repurpose: Former Grain Silo Jubblingly Converted To Student Housing.

Grünerløkka Student House - Oslo Norway.Instead of ending up in one of those YouTube demolition compilation videos, a grain silo in Oslo Norway was converted into a 19 story student housing structure. The Grünerløkka Student House was recycled in 2001 and has 226 residences. From Inhabitat:

“Residents of Grünerløkka Studenthus enjoy excellent views of Oslo, as the 174-foot structure towers over its surroundings. The building consists of mostly studios and one-bedroom apartments, and unsurprisingly, most of the rooms are round. The unique building has become an architectural icon, and it won the City of Oslo’s Architecture Prize in 2002.”

It’s great to hear stories about a carefully designed building that reuses an existing structure. In a way, they trump newly constructed LEED Platinum rated buildings. [Inhabitat]

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Non-Food ‘Cellulosic’ Ethanol Could Be Price Competitive With Gasoline By 2016.

Cellulosic ethanol production.According to research company Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF), ethanol produced from non-food materials (inedible parts of plants, woods, and grasses) will be price competitive with corn-based ethanol and gasoline by 2016. It’s a second generation biofuel called cellulosic ethanol and for years, figuring out how to cost effectively produce ethanol from non-edible plants has been a challenge. From BNEF:

“The survey collected data and predictions on the production costs of 11 leading players in the cellulosic ethanol industry. All use a technique, commonly called enzymatic hydrolysis, to break down and convert the complex sugars in non-food crop matter, and a fermentation stage to turn the results into ethanol. The results showed that in 2012, the cost of cellulosic ethanol production was $0.94 per litre, around 40% higher than the $0.67 per litre cost of producing ethanol from corn, which dominates the US biofuel market and is competitive with US gasoline. By 2016, respondents thought the price of cellulosic ethanol would match that of corn-based ethanol.”

Why is the move to cellulosic biofuels so important? From BusinessGreen:

“Cellulosic biofuels are widely regarded as critical to the development of the biofuels industry, as they allow developers to produce fuels from waste material or fast-growing grasses removing the need for energy crops that have been blamed for eating into agricultural land and driving up food prices.”

Another benefit of cellulosic ethanol is that its production can reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) by up to 85% over reformulated gasoline according to a study conducted by Michael Wang of the Argonne National Laboratory. Starch-based ethanol made from corn reduces greenhouse gas emissions by 18-29% over reformulated gasoline. [BusinessGreen and BNEF]

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