Took The Kids To Watch The Documentary “Chasing Ice.”

After posting an article about the woman who had been changed by watching the film “Chasing Ice,” I made it a priority to see the documentary myself and to bring my kids to it. I wanted to get their take on the film because it’s really about their future.

Chasing Ice - James Balog“Chasing Ice” tracks the efforts of nature photographer James Balog to time-lapse photograph the shrinking glaciers of Iceland, Greenland and Alaska. He is supported by a team of scientists, technicians, and his family. Mr. Balog’s goal was to photograph the glaciers over 3-years and he wasn’t sure what he would capture during that span.

When James Balog and his team piece the photos together, the final video of the glaciers retreating is pretty startling. In some instances, they had to shift their cameras multiple times to keep the receding glaciers in frame. And the melt wasn’t just about the glaciers retreating; the team noticed that the glaciers followed a recede and shrink (in height) pattern.

“Is it too late to do anything?”
Chasing Ice (Film)Right after the movie, I had to find out what my kids and their friend thought about Chasing Ice. They weren’t shocked by the film but they were a little quiet. Then my daughter’s friend asked her dad: “is it too late to do anything?” I think that’s the question the filmmakers wanted viewers to ask themselves after watching the film.

What can we do? On a daily basis, we can all make an effort to live as small as possible but what’s happening in the Arctic circle is bigger than just consuming less. Chasing Ice was the alarm – now we need to take action and develop more effective ways to get our elected officials to listen and act. That is why we’re going to turn this into a series of posts that pick up where the film ends. Check back in a couple weeks for our followup article on what you can do to help make a difference. [Chasing Ice]

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Summer Rayne Oakes’ Film ‘eXtinction’ Environmentally Chronicles What Has And Will Happen In Her Lifetime. (NSFW’ish)

This is definitely the first time nudity has appeared on Jubbling but the message in the 5-minute film “eXtinction” is too important to pass up. It features Summer Rayne Oakes, who also wrote and produced the film, and environmentally tracks everything that has happened to the planet in her lifetime, so far, and then looks at the dire future world we’ll be living in unless we change our ways. We previously wrote about Ms. Oakes’ charity-driven one dress for a month campaign.

Visit the film’s Tumblr page to find out how you can help. [Treehugger]

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Some Eco-Friendly Alternatives To Your Traditional Christmas Tree Are Not Very Cash-Friendly To Your Wallet.

One Two Tree.Cut Christmas trees and Halloween pumpkins share a common afterlife – they both have a meaningful place in our home for a short period of time and then they’re both hastily discarded. That’s why finding a lasting alternative to the traditional Christmas tree is so important.

Jubiltree Non-Traditional Christmas Tree Alternative.Inhabitat’s article, “14 Eco-Friendly Design Alternatives to the Traditional Christmas Tree,” was well-researched, timely and offered eco’ish alternatives to traditional Christmas trees but the prices can get more pretty crazy. Granted, a few of the smaller non-traditional tree options sell in the $20 range but four of the models listed in the artcle are priced above $349 and the wooden Jubiltree* eclipses the $500 mark. I may be wrong but I don’t think unreasonably over-priced alt-Christmas trees are going to change buying habits.

That’s why Jubbling would like to help you find reusable Christmas tree options that won’t crush your bank account and can be sourced locally. Our two reusable picks are the potted living Christmas tree and a used plastic tree from your local Goodwill store.

Going with a reusable potted living Christmas tree ($50-75) requires some management but it’s a great option for people who prefer an un-dead natural tree. If you’re ok with a plastic one, Goodwill has an assortment of previously-loved options in the $5-20 price range. Ideally, purchasing a used plastic tree means another new one will not be manufactured.

Consumers shouldn’t have to spend $500 on a eco-suavé Christmas tree alternative in order to gain some green street cred. Reusable Christmas trees that are wallet-friendly and match your preference (natural or artificial) are available and you don’t have to travel very far to find one. [Inhabitat]


*Jubiltree and Jubbling are not related.

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If Only The Crib Dribbler Were Real.

Crib Dribbler - Prank PackI’m trying to find the Jubbling in the genuine faux Crib Dribbler. It’s one of Prank Pack’s fake gift boxes but what aEnfamil Baby Formula 22-Pack great idea if you’re going the formula route! I guess the Jubbling could be filling the Crib Dribbler with bulk formula (reduce) instead of feeding your little one Enfamil from disposable containers.

More Jubbling happens after your kid has hamstered his/her last sip and you’ve rinsed out (reuse/recycle) your Crib Dribbler and refilled it with bulk formula (reduce). Just imagine how much more rest you would get with your kiddo Crib Dribbling (precycling?). [Gizmodo]

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Shopping For Electronics? Best To Compare Price, Features And Planned Obsolescence Of Each Brand.

Electronic WasteWired posted an article, “Copyright and Planned Obsolescence: The Shady World of Repair Manuals,” about the need for free online product manuals and how it may conflict with a manufacturer’s copyrights – especially if the manufacturer prefers that you replace your electronic device rather than fix it. But is that in the manufacturer’s best interest?

Probably not and that’s why Jubbling decided to share our experience buying and selling electronics by offering some shopping tips:

  1. The savviest shoppers go to industry related blogs and find out how a future purchase performs. Following a thread is a great way to track defects and how they are handled by the manufacturer. Sample: home theater, cameras etc.
  2. Check IFixit for repairability information and manuals.
  3. If you’ve done your research and narrowed down your brand, contact the manufacturer or visit their website to find out if they have a local service center – especially for televisions. There’s nothing worse than re-boxing and shipping 42″ TV with a bad power supply across the country for repair.
  4. Make electronics purchases with American Express. Not only will AMEX add a year of warranty to the manufacturer’s standard warranty but if it breaks, they actually want to help you get it fixed.

Ultimately, it is in the best interest of electronics manufacturers to build a quality product so they will keep you as a customer for life. Offering service manuals online is a no-brainer and should have nothing to do with copyrights. Products should not be designed with planned obsolescence in mind – it’s not how you build brand loyalty.

As a kid, I remember my parents getting the call from Sears checking to see if we wanted to buy extended service contracts on their “almost out of warranty” appliances. The conversation went something like this:

Sears Rep: “Would like to buy an extended warranty on your Kenmore dishwasher?”


Parents: “No thank you.”


Sears Rep: “So what are you going to do if your dishwasher breaks outside of the warranty period and you’re not covered?”


Parents: “If we can’t get it repaired, I guess we’ll have to go out and buy another one. Only this time, we won’t be buying a Kenmore.”


Prior to ordering, Google your next electronics purchase by part # and put “repairs” at the end. And always keep in mind that the retailer isn’t concerned about the durability of the product you purchased. If it breaks, you’ll come back and buy a new one and your sales rep will get to say “chi-ching” as you walk out the door with your replacement purchase. (Don’t be a chi-ching.) [Wired]

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Jubbling Break Hero: 80 Year Old Grandpa Ignores Disposable Solo Cups And Does A Keg Stand Instead.

Keg stand Grandpa doesn’t need a disposable Solo cup: Great example of Jubbling or is it just something we’d all like to do when were 80? [Buzzfeed]

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